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  • Cotoneaster 'Hessei' (Hesse cotoneaster)

    Leaves and developing fruit of Hesse cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Cotoneaster, Hesse cotoneaster
    Hesse cotoneaster is a hybrid between Cotoneaster horizontalis and Cotoneaster adpressus var. praecox. This low-growing cotoneaster was selected by The Morton Arboretum and introduced through the Chicagoland Grows™ introduction program. Hesse cotoneaster makes a wonderful ground cover, draped over a wall, or used in mass.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster acutifolia (Peking cotoneaster)

    Also known as:

    Peking cotoneaster
    Peking cotoneaster, often confused with hedge cotoneaster, is a large shrub for back of the border. Small pink flowers and reddish, persistent fruit attract birds and wildlife.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster adpressus (Creeping cotoneaster)

    Creeping cotoneaster growing over a low wall.

    Also known as:

    Creeping cotoneaster, early cotoneaster
    Creeping cotoneaster is a dense, low-growing, spreading shrub used as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or cascading over stone walls. Valued for its tiny white flowers, excellent glossy foliage and attractive red berries.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet),
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster apiculata (Cranberry cotoneaster)

    Leaves of cranberry cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Cranberry cotoneaster
    The stiff, arching branches of the cranberry cotoneaster form an impenetrable mass, making it very effective cascading over a wall, in a shrub border, as a foundation plant, or a ground cover. Small, dark green, glossy leaves and cranberry-red fruit make it a nice addition to the landscape.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster dammeri (Bearberry cotoneaster)

    Leaves of bearberry cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Bearberry cotoneaster
    Bearberry cotoneaster is a low-growing, semi-evergreen shrub reaching 1 to 2 feet high with a 6 feet wide spread. Use in groups on slopes to stabilize soil, ground cover, or front of shrub borders. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet),
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches),
    • Medium plant (12-24 inches),
    • Small plant (6-12 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster divaricatus (Spreading cotoneaster)

    Spreading cotoneaster showing fall color.

    Also known as:

    spreading cotoneaster
    Spreading cotoneaster is a medium-sized, upright shrub with slender, densely branched stems. Tiny pink buds open in May to clusters of white flowers, and glossy, dark green summer foliage turns a kaleidoscope of orange, red, yellow and burgundy.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster horizontalis (Rock cotoneaster)

    Leaves and branch structure of rock cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    rock cotoneaster; rockspray
    Rock cotoneaster is a low spreading shrub often used as a ground cover or left to spill over slopes and ledge walls. The densely branched plant has glossy, dark green foliage, deep red fruits and reddish purple fall color.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet),
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster lucida (Hedge cotoneaster)

    Leaves and flower buds of hedge cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Hedge cotoneaster, Peking cotoneaster
    Hedge cotoneaster is an upright shrub with spreading branches reaching 8 to 10 feet high. Attractive dark green foliage turns a yellow to red in the fall. Makes an excellent screen or tall hedge. Attractive black fruit persist into winter.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster multiflora (Showy cotoneaster)

    Showy cotoneaster in full flower.

    Also known as:

    Showy cotoneaster, many-flowered cotoneaster
    Showy cotoneaster is a useful ornamental shrub for a mixed border, in mass, for screening, or as a single specimen. Abundant clusters of small, white flowers cover the showy cotoneaster in spring. In fall, the shrub’s yellow-tinted foliage acts as a backdrop for the showy red fruit. Plant showy cotoneaster in full sun to ensure an outstanding display.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Crataegus coccinea (Scarlet hawthorn)

    Leaves of scarlet hawthorn.

    Also known as:

    scarlet hawthorn, red haw, red-fruited hawthorn
    Scarlet hawthorn is a small tree that can be utilized under power lines. It has white flowers in spring followed by red fruit. The tree does bear long thorns.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus crus-galli (Cockspur hawthorn)

    Cockspur hawthorn in full flower.

    Also known as:

    cockspur hawthorn
    Cockspur hawthorn is a Chicago-area native that provides beautiful flowers in spring and persistent fruit in fall and winter. This species should be used with care as it has long thorns and is prone to disease. White flowers in the spring, persistent red fruit, and the orange-red fall color of this Midwestern native make it a nice addition to the four-season landscape.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus crus-galli var. inermis (Thornless cockspur hawthorn)

    Flowers and thornless stems of thornless cockspur hawthorn.

    Also known as:

    thornless cockspur hawthorn
    This variety of cockspur hawthorn has thornless stems. It displays beautiful white flowers in spring and persistent fruit in fall and winter.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus laevigata (Whitethorn)

    Also known as:

    whitethorn, English hawthorn
    Whitethorn or English hawthorn is a small tree that can be utilized under power lines, but it may be difficult to find in nurseries. Typical of hawthorns, this species has white flowers in spring, followed by red fruits. Stems bear one inch long thorns.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Crataegus mollis (Downy hawthorn)

    A mature downy hawthorn tree.

    Also known as:

    downy hawthorn
    Downy hawthorn has the typical white flowers and red fruit of hawthorns, but is not always as thorny as other species. This native tree is beautiful, but is prone to the cedar rust diseases.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus monogyna (Single-seeded hawthorn)

    Also known as:

    single-seeded hawthorn, oneseed hawthorn, common hawthorn
    Single-seeded hawthorn, like other hawthorns, bears white flowers in spring, followed by red fruits. Unlike other hawthorns, the flowers are sweetly scented (most hawthorn flowers have an "off" odor).

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Crataegus phaenopyrum (Washington hawthorn)

    Leaves and fruit of Washington hawthorn.

    Also known as:

    Washington hawthorn
    Washington hawthorn is one of the commonly planted hawthorn species. It has the typical white flowers, followed by red fruit that persist into winter. This species is fairly thorny and is prone to the cedar-rust diseases.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus punctata (Dotted hawthorn)

    Dotted hawthorn in full flower.

    Also known as:

    Dotted hawthorn
    Dotted hawthorn is named for its fruit which are red with white specks. This species has thorns that are up to three inches in length. Dotted hawthorn is very susceptible to the cedar rust diseases.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus viridis (Green hawthorn)

    Flowers of green hawthorn.

    Also known as:

    green hawthorn
    Green hawthorn offers beautiful flowers and fruit and is more disease resistant than other species of hawthorn. The cultivar 'Winter King' is more commonly sold than the species.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Daphne mezereum (February daphne)

    Flowers of February daphne.

    Also known as:

    February daphne; mezereon; paradise-plant, spurge laurel, garland flower
    February daphne is a dense, rounded shrub with highly fragrant rosy-lilac flowers in early spring. Small red fruit appear later in the summer. A plant for well-drained soils only, may be short-lived.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Daphne x burkwoodii (Burkwood's daphne)

    Flowers and leaves of Burkwood's Daphne, cultivar 'Carol Mackie'.

    Also known as:

    Burkwood's daphne, burkwood daphne
    Burkwood's daphne is a semi-evergreen shrub for sandy, well-drained soils. The wide-spreading, 3- to 4-foot high shrub is grown for its extremely fragrant flower clusters in May. This plant will suffer in cold winters and should be located in a protected site. The cultivar 'Carol Mackie' is a popular variegated form. May be difficult to find in local nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Deschampsia cespitosa (Tufted hair grass)

    Turfted hair grass, cultivar Schottland, in autumn.

    Also known as:

    Tufted hair grass, tussock grass
    Tufted hair grass is a clump-forming, cool season grass. This grass has a wide natural range, being found in Europe, Asia and North America.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Deutzia gracilis (Slender deutzia)

    Flower buds of slender deutzia.

    Also known as:

    Slender deutzia
    Slender arching stems covered in clusters of white flowers grace this shrub in late spring. Use in front of border, edging a walkway, or in groups. A yearly pruning is needed to keep deutzia looking tidy.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Deutzia lemoinei (Lemoine's deutzia)

    Flowers of lemoine's deutzia.

    Also known as:

    Lemoine's deutzia, lemoine deutzia
    Lemoine's deutzia is a mounded, densely twiggy shrub with erect branches. Outstanding pure white flower clusters appear in May. Medium-green foliage turns a clear yellow in the fall. Use in groups, shrub borders, and foundation plantings.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Deutzia scabra (Rough-leaved deutzia)

    Leaves of rough-leaved deutzia.

    Also known as:

    Rough-leaved deutzia, roughleaf deutzia, fuzzy deutzia
    Rough-leaved deutzia is an old-fashioned, large, upright to oval, spreading shrub reaching 6 to 10 feet tall and 4 to 8 feet wide. The spreading, arching stems are laden with showy, pink-tinged white flower panicles in spring. The dark, peeling bark adds winter texture. Best at back of border or use as a screen. May be difficult to find in nursery with newer and more improved plants available.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Dichanthelium clandestinum (syn. Panicum clandestinum) (Deer tongue grass)

    Also known as:

    Deer tongue grass
    Deer tongue grass is a native grass with an exotic bamboo-like appearance. This warm season, clumping grass tolerates dryness and infertile soils very well. It can be used for naturalizing in tough sites.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Diervilla lonicera (Bush-honeysuckle)

    Bush-honeysuckle in flower.

    Also known as:

    Bush-honeysuckle, Dwarf bushhoneysuckle, bush honeysuckle
    Bush-honeysuckle is a low-growing, spreading, native shrub providing yellow flowers for several weeks in early summer. Reddish young stems is 4-sided, contrasting with dark green leaves.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet),
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Diervilla rivularis (Georgia bush-honeysuckle)

    Flowers of Georgia bush-honeysuckle, cultivar 'Morton' (Summer Stars).

    Also known as:

    Georgia bush-honeysuckle, Georgia bush honeysuckle, mountain bush honeysuckle, hairy bush-honeysuckle, riverbank bush honeysuckle
    Georgia bush-honeysuckle, also called mountain bush-honeysuckle is a fast growing, eastern U.S. native found in the southern Appalachian Mountains in moist wooded areas and woodland edges. The mounding habit and arching stems produce small clusters of yellow trumpet blooms in July and August. New growth emerges with a bronze-red foliage, which later turns green then to a lovely red in the fall. Adapts to most soils and is drought tolerant when established.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Diervilla sessilifolia (Southern bush-honeysuckle)

    Fall color of Southern bush-honeysuckle, cultivar 'Butterfly'.

    Also known as:

    Southern bush-honeysuckle, Southern bush honeysuckle
    Southern bush-honeysuckle is a vigorous, 3 to 5 feet high, spreading shrub with rich green foliage that turns purplish in the fall. The 2- to 3-inch-diameter sulfur-yellow flowers appear in mid-summer. The suckering nature of the plant can form colonies making it ideal as a mass planting or used to stabilize a slope. Native to the southeastern United States.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet),
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Diospyros virginiana (Persimmon)

    Persimmon fruit.

    Also known as:

    Persimmon, Common Persimmon
    Persimmon is a southeastern U.S. native tree that is easily recognized in winter by its unusual rugged, blocky bark. Female trees produce large orange-brown fleshy fruit that are edible after the first frost. Thick, dark green leaves turn a yellow fall color. Native persimmon is not readily available in nurseries, but several selected cultivars are produced for their edible fruit.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet),
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Dirca palustris (Leatherwood)

    Leaves of leatherwood.

    Also known as:

    Leatherwood, Eastern Leatherwood
    Leatherwood is an interesting, under-used native shrub with small yellow flowers in early spring before leaves emerge. Light green leaves turn a bright yellow color in autumn. This plant is difficult to find in commercial nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America

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