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  • Viburnum 'Emerald Triumph' (Emerald Triumph viburnum)

    Also known as:

    Emerald Triumph viburnum
    Emerald Triumph viburnum is a cross between Viburnum rhytidophylloides ‘Allegheny’ and Viburnum burejaeticum. The compact rounded shrub has white, flat-topped flowers followed by persistent green to red to black fruits. The thick, leathery dark green leaves turn yellow and red in the fall.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum acerifolium (Maple-leaved viburnum)

    The white flat-top flower and maple-like leaf of maple-leaved viburnum

    Also known as:

    Maple-leaved viburnum, Maple-leaved arrowwood, Mapleleaf viburnum, dockmackie
    Maple-leaved viburnum is a native, medium-sized under-story shrub, preferring shade and part shade conditions. It makes it a great option for naturalizing in shady areas. The creamy-white, flat-topped flowers in May, black fruit in fall persisting into winter, and excellent pink to dark burgundy fall color add year-round interest.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum carlesii (Korean spice viburnum)

    The semi-snowball white flowers of fragrant viburnum

    Also known as:

    Korean spice viburnum, Koreanspice viburnum
    Korean spice viburnum's most notable characteristic is the intoxicating fragrant white flowers that cover the shrub in spring. The pink to red budded white flowers have a pink blush, leaves are a dull, dark green that turn outstanding wine-red in the fall. An excellent choice as specimen, in a shrub border, and as a foundation plant. Place it where the fragrant flowers can be enjoyed.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum cassinoides (Witherod)

    Lustrous elliptical leaves and white flowers of Witherod viburnum

    Also known as:

    Witherod, Witherod viburnum, Swamp viburnum, Appalachian tea viburnum, wild raisin
    Witherod viburnum is a large, upright-spreading, suckering shrub, native to North America. It tolerates both shady and wet sites, excellent for naturalizing, shrub borders and woodland sites. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Viburnum dentatum (Southern arrowwood)

    Creamy white flower cluster of arrowwood viburnum

    Also known as:

    Southern arrowwood, arrowwood viburnum, downy arrowwood
    Southern arrowwood, also known as Arrowwood viburnum, is valued for its durability and utility in the landscape. Southern arrowwood's ornamental features include white, flat-topped flowers in late spring, ink-blue fruits in September, and wine-red fall color. The native shrub makes a great screen, informal hedge, and is useful in groupings and masses, or as filler in the border.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum dilatatum (Linden viburnum)

    Linden viburnum produces bright red fruit.

    Also known as:

    Linden viburnum
    Linden viburnum is a multi-stemmed, upright to rounded shrub reaching 8 to 10 feet high and wide. Profuse clusters of white, flat-topped flowers are followed by showy red fruits often persisting into winter. Fall color can be a kaleidoscope of orange, red and yellow. A great four season plant for the shrub border. This species has demonstrated some invasive tendency in select states. Consult your local state invasive list.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum farreri (Fragrant viburnum)

    Pinkish-white flowers of fragrant viburnum

    Also known as:

    Fragrant viburnum
    Fragrant viburnum is an old-fashioned shrub grown for its highly sweet, pinkish-white flowers in early spring. The 4-inch long leaves emerge bronzy-green changing to dark green. Fall color is a reddish purple. Plants tend to be leggy and best in a mixed borer where smaller plants can mask the bare stems.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum lantana (Wayfaring tree)

    White flower cluster of Wayfaring tree viburnum

    Also known as:

    Wayfaring tree
    Wayfaring tree is a large rounded shrub often used because for its adaptability and reliability. Thick, dark green leaves, white spring flowers, and beautiful clusters of red to yellow to black berries add to the ornamental appeal. Plants often appear ‘leggy,’ so use near the back of the border, in mass, or in groupings. A good plant for naturalizing.

    Size Range:

    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum lentago (Nannyberry)

    Creamy-white flowers of Nannyberry viburnum.

    Also known as:

    Nannyberry, Nannyberry viburnum, Sheepberry
    Nannyberry is grown as a large shrub or a small tree reaching 15 to 20 feet high, known for its dark, lustrous green leaves which turn maroon-red in the fall. This Midwest native is typically found in woodlands and wood edges, a great plant for naturalizing.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum opulus var. americanum (American cranberry-bush)

    Leaves and fruit of American cranberry-bush viburnum.

    Also known as:

    American cranberry-bush, American cranberry-bush viburnum, American cranberrybush viburnum
    This native viburnum offers ornamental interest throughout the seasons; flowers in spring, red fruit in late summer and red fall color.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum opulus var. opulus (syn. Viburnum opulus) (European cranberry-bush viburnum (not recommended))

    Leaves and fruit of European cranberry-bush viburnum.

    Also known as:

    European cranberry-bush, European cranberry-bush viburnum, European cranberrybush viburnum
    European cranberry-bush viburnum is an attractive, multi-season interest shrub, but it has become an invasive plant in some states and is not recommended. The similar, native American cranberry-bush viburnum (Vibrunum opulus var. americanum) is a more recommended substitute. It has the same ornamental features and is native to North America.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum plicatum var. plicatum (Doublefile viburnum)

    Doublefile viburnum in full flower.

    Also known as:

    Doublefile viburnum, Japanese snowball viburnum
    Doublefile viburnum or Japanese snowball viburnum, Viburnum plicatum var. plicatum, produces 2 to 3 inch wide showy, snowball-type clusters of white flowers in spring. A dense, upright, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub with somewhat horizontal branching that grows 8 to 12 feet high. Dark green leaves are strongly-veined, toothed, with pleated upper surfaces turn a burgundy red to purplish red in fall. Although this shrub is well suited for the Midwestern landscape it can occasionally winter kill to the ground. This profile page also covers Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum. The difference is V. plicatum var. plicatum flowers are snowball-type flower clusters and bloom 2 to 3 weeks later than V. plicatum var tomentosum, which has a ring of large, sterile flowers surrounding a large center of small, fertile flowers.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum prunifolium (Black-haw viburnum)

    Flat-topped flower cluster of black-haw viburnum

    Also known as:

    Black-haw, blackhaw, blackhaw viburnum
    Black-haw viburnum is a large shrub or a small, native tree. In spring new leaves emerge copper-colored followed by white, flat-topped flowers. In fall, black fruits contrast with the pinkish-red foliage. A great plant for naturalized areas.

    Size Range:

    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum rafinesquianum (Downy arrowwood)

    Upright, white flowers and green leaves of downy arrowwood viburnum

    Also known as:

    Downy arrowwood, Downy arrowwood viburnum. Missouri viburnum
    Downy arrowwood is a little known native viburnum that has ornamental characteristics similar to the more commonly planted southern arrowwood.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum rhytidophyllum (Leatherleaf viburnum)

    Creamy white flowers of leatherleaf viburnum

    Also known as:

    Leatherleaf viburnum
    Leatherleaf viburnum is considered a large, rough textured, evergreen shrub, but in northern climates it will lose its leaves in late autumn and often suffers stem dieback in cold winters. While the creamy white flowers light up the spring landscape, this species offers no fall color change and very little fruiting.

    Size Range:

    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum rufidulum (Southern black-haw)

    Glossy green foliage of Southern black-haw viburnum

    Also known as:

    Southern black-haw, rusty black-haw, southern blackhaw, rusty blackhaw
    Southern black-haw is an attractive large shrub or small tree with lustrous, waxy green foliage, creamy-white flowers in mid-spring, dark blue berries on red stems and shiny, maroon to deep burgundy fall color. Native to the southeastern United States. A great four-season plant for the Midwest.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Viburnum sargentii (Sargent's cranberry-bush viburnum)

    Lacecap flowers of Sargent's cranberry-bush viburnum

    Also known as:

    Sargent's cranberry-bush; Sargent's viburnum; Sargent's cranberry-bush viburnum; Sargent viburnum
    Sargent's cranberry-bush viburnum is an upright, rounded shrub with a coarse branching habit. The white lacecap flowers have purple anthers. The bright red fruits are persistent. New foliage is burgundy changing to dark green then to a wine-red fall color adding to the seasonal interest.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum setigerum (Tea viburnum)

    White, slightly fragrant flowers of tea viburnum

    Also known as:

    Tea viburnum
    One of the best fruiting viburnums, this little known viburnum produces bright red fruit clusters, white spring flowers and muted red fall color. A good plant for sun or shade reaching 8 to 12 feet high and 6 to 10 feet wide. May be difficult to find in nursery trade.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum sieboldii (Siebold viburnum)

    White flower clusters of Siebold viburnum

    Also known as:

    Siebold viburnum
    This large shrub or small tree has glossy dark green leaves with toothed edges. In May creamy-white flowers are followed by clusters of red berries. The shiny dark green leaves turn burgundy in fall.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum x carlcephalum (Fragrant snowball)

    Flowers of fragrant snowball viburnum.

    Also known as:

    Fragrant snowball, Carlcephalum viburnum
    Fragrant snowball viburnum is a large, open shrub reaching 6 to 10 feet high. It is one of the last of the very fragrant, snowball-shaped flowers to bloom in spring. The dark oval green leaves turn a beautiful reddish-purple in the fall.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum x juddii (Judd's viburnum)

    Pink buds and white flowers of the hybrid Judd's viburnum

    Also known as:

    Judd's viburnum, Judd viburnum
    This hybrid viburnum produces early spring, snowball-type clusters of pink buds that open to white, highly fragrant flowers. A dense, rounded shrub reaching 6 to 8 feet high with blue-green leaves. Korean spice viburnum is one of the parent of this hybrid.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viburnum x rhytidophylloides (Hybrid leatherleaf viburnum)

    Creamy white flowers of hybrid leatherleaf viburnum

    Also known as:

    Hybrid leatherleaf viburnum, Lantanaphyllum viburnum
    Leatherleaf viburnum is a large, semi-evergreen shrub reaching 8 to 10 feet high, used for background borders, screening or specimen plantings. It is a hybrid cross between Wayfaringtree and leatherleaf viburnum. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Vinca minor (Common periwinkle)

    Common periwinkle has beautiful periwinkle blue flowers.

    Also known as:

    Common periwinkle, periwinkle, vinca, myrtle
    Common periwinkle is widely available for sale as a ground cover and it has been used in landscapes for many decades. In some areas, however, it is escaping cultivation into natural areas and should be used with caution.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Viola labradorica (Labrador violet)

    Labrador violet, variety purpurea, has purple tones in its leaves.

    Also known as:

    Labrador violet, alpine violet, dog violet, American dog violet
    Violets are often thought of as weeds in the garden, but they can also serve as ground covers. Labrador violet offers no fragrance, but it does has pretty purple flowers in mid- to late spring.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Vitex agnus-castus (Chaste tree)

    Lavender-blue flower spikes of chastetree

    Also known as:

    Chaste tree
    The chaste tree, which is really a shrub, is a good choice for the shrub border or as a specimen. The upright clusters of lavender-blue, summer-blooming flowers and aromatic gray-green leaves attract butterflies. In northern region, chaste tree should be cut to ground in early spring.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Vitis coignetiae (Crimson glory vine)

    Also known as:

    Crimson glory vine
    Crimson glory vine is an ornamental grape grown for its excellent fall color. The fruit produced are not edible. This plant may be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Waldsteinia ternata (Barren-strawberry)

    Barren strawberry beginning to flower.

    Also known as:

    Barren-strawberry, barren strawberry, dry strawberry, yellow strawberry
    Barren-strawberry is a durable, low-growing ground cover. It produces bright yellow flowers in early summer.

    Size Range:

    • Small plant (6-12 inches),
    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Weigela florida (Old fashioned weigela)

    Old fashioned weigela, cultivar 'Alexandra, in flower.

    Also known as:

    Old fashioned weigela, Old-fashioned weigela, Cardinal bush
    Old-fashioned weigela fills gardens with bright tubular flowers in early summer often blooming again as the season progresses. Summer foliage is neat and tidy, relatively disease free. There are many cultivated varieties available in different sizes and flower colors.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet),
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Wisteria floribunda (Japanese wisteria)

    Japanese wisteria in flower.

    Also known as:

    Japanese wisteria, Japanese wistaria
    Japanese wisteria is a beautiful vine in flower, but it is an aggressive grower and is considered invasive in some areas, especially in the southern United States. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this vine for planting sites.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Wisteria frutescens (American wisteria)

    Flowers of American wisteria.

    Also known as:

    American wisteria, American wistaria
    American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens; syn. Wistaria frutescens) is a woody vine that produces beautiful hanging clusters of purple flowers. This species is native to North America. It is a good alternate to the Japanese and Chinese wisterias that have become invasive in some areas.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America

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