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  • NEWS RELEASE: NEW REPORT OFFERS STRATEGIES TO HELP BOTANICAL GARDENS STRENGTHEN CONSERVATION VALUE OF COLLECTIONS

    With more than 8,000 tree species threatened with extinction, an urgent need exists for botanical gardens to protect threatened trees in dedicated conservation collections. A new report published in the international conservation journal Oryx offers strategies and guidelines to help botanical gardens strengthen the conservation value of their tree collections.
  • NEWS RELEASE: THE MORTON ARBORETUM TO HOST PERENNIAL PLANT SYMPOSIUM, “READY! SET! GARDEN!”

    The Morton Arboretum and the Perennial Plant Association will host “Ready! Set! Garden!,” a day-long symposium featuring top gardening experts and strategies and tips for the 2015 growing season. Taking place from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, February 28 at The Morton Arboretum, “Ready! Set! Garden!” will include something for gardeners of all backgrounds and interests.
  • NEWS RELEASE: MARCH-APRIL 2015 PROGRAMS AT THE MORTON ARBORETUM

    Celebrate spring’s return at The Morton Arboretum with a slate of exciting events and programs that explore a season of buds and blooms as well as the Arboretum’s signature holiday, Arbor Day.
  • Art and fun come together in Arboretum Uncorked

    Nature is the ultimate muse. Visitors look for inspiration in the Arboretum’s landscapes and at this time of year, they find it in a forest blanketed in sparking snow or in the light from a mid-morning sun as it peeks through bare branches.
  • Great reads from the Sterling Morton Library

    The Sterling Morton Library is a treasure trove. Discover all it has to offer as well as these staff recommended titles the next time you’re here.
  • Be alert to animal damage in the garden

    Animals that need food to survive the winter can take a toll on shrubs and young trees, but you can take simple steps to minimize the damage. Peter Linsner, who is in charge of controlling animal damage at The Morton Arboretum, offers these tips: Check regularly for signs of damage. Voles, mice, rabbits, and deer may chew the thin bark of shrubs and young trees, and if they remove the bark all the way around a stem, it will die. Look around the base of the stems or trunk for signs that the bark has been nibbled.