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  • THE MORTON ARBORETUM NAMES NEW TREE CONSERVATION SPECIALIST

    LISLE, Ill. (December 19, 2013) – Murphy Westwood, Ph.D., has joined The Morton Arboretum staff as tree conservation specialist. In this newly established role, Westwood is part of the Arboretum’s Science and Conservation department, focusing on the conservation of endangered tree species both locally and globally.
  • CHECK OFF YOUR HOLIDAY GIFT LIST AT THE MORTON ARBORETUM STORE

    LISLE, IL (December 10, 2013)—The Morton Arboretum store is a great place to shop this year for unique, nature-themed holiday gifts, and from 3-5 p.m. this Monday, December 16, non-members can shop The Arboretum Store without paying admission to the Arboretum.
  • Exploring the wonders of snow

    A good snowfall is a chance to throw snowballs, build forts, spot animal tracks, and notice how white highlights outline the shapes of trees, says Tifanie Treter, who often teaches about snow in Winter Science Camps at The Morton Arboretum. Treter suggests bringing a sketchbook to capture the shape of a tree outlined by snow. A camera, a magnifying glass, and a field guide to identify animal tracks will add to the fun.
  • Winter is prime pruning time

    Winter is a fine time to prune shrubs. When the leaves are gone, you can see the true form of the plant to help you choose which branch to cut, says Kunso Kim, head of collections and curator at The Morton Arboretum. How you prune will depend on each shrub’s situation.
  • Protect your plants from animals over the winter

    Animals that need food to survive the winter can take a toll on perennials, shrubs, and young trees. Simple steps can minimize the damage, according to Peter Linsner, who is in charge of animal control at The Morton Arboretum.
  • Cones are time-tested packaging

    What is a pine or spruce cone? Think of it as an egg carton. Each of the layered scales once created a sealed compartment for one or two seeds. You can find many sizes and shapes of cones among the more than 100 kinds of trees in the Conifer Collection at The Morton Arboretum. Their ancestry is ancient: Conifer fossils go back 300 million years.