The Morton Arboretum logo

VISIT & explore

Articles and stories

Science and conservation

  • Hopeful young oaks and hackberries are taking root in the Lincoln Hill subdivision in unincorporated Milton Township south of Glen Ellyn.
  • Trees are good, right? Planting trees is the right thing to do. They make the world greener, healthier, and more beautiful. That is what we know and promote at The Morton Arboretum.

  • LISLE, Ill. (January 3, 2014)—When The Morton Arboretum’s P.J. Smith works with his staff to clear snow from the 16 miles of roads and nine miles of trails at the Arboretum, he needs to do it quickly and in the most environmentally friendly manner possible. Smith, construction supervisor in charge of snow removal at The Morton Arboretum, now clears the Arboretum roads with a product containing an unusual ingredient – beet juice – which, when mixed with rock salt, clears the Arboretum’s roads and trails quicker than salt alone.
  • LISLE, Ill. (December 19, 2013) – Murphy Westwood, Ph.D., has joined The Morton Arboretum staff as tree conservation specialist. In this newly established role, Westwood is part of the Arboretum’s Science and Conservation department, focusing on the conservation of endangered tree species both locally and globally.
  • The Morton Arboretum, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, has today released the results of their “Urban Trees and Forests of the Chicago Region” study of trees in the seven-county Chicago region.
  • The Arboretum’s research efforts have brought its scientists two prestigious awards in recent months.
  • Dr. Bryant Scharenbroch, an urban soil scientist at The Morton Arboretum, is this year's recipient of the International Society of Arboriculture's (ISA) Early Career Scientist Award.
  • The ArbNet Arboretum Accreditation Program and The Morton Arboretum are pleased to announce that Helen Avalynne Tawes Garden in Annapolis, MD has been awarded a Level I Accreditation. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, Tawes Garden is now recognized as an accredited arboretum in The Morton Register of Arboreta.

  • The Morton Arboretum welcomes a new scientist to its research staff. Dr. Jake Miesbauer joined the Arboretum on June 17 as a Research Arborist. In this newly established role, Miesbauer will help launch a new research program primarily focused on improving the health and safety of urban trees through practical topics.
  • Dr. Gerard T. Donnelly, President and CEO of The Morton Arboretum, is the 2013 recipient of the most prestigious honor conferred by the American Public Gardens Association (APGA).
  • The Arboretum’s new tree breeder has his eye on the landscapes of the future.
  • The growing season is a time for the Arboretum’s researchers to grow knowledge.
  • It’s the gardener’s prerogative to decide what to plant. But what we don’t plant is important too.
  • It takes a special kind of dedication to become a Woodland Steward.
  • The Community Trees Program supports towns, parks, school districts, community groups, and individuals in caring for the urban forest.
  • Learn more about how plants from China have entered our gardens and how plants are responding to climate change.
  • The Morton Arboretum's innovative Wetlands Restoration Program is named as 2012 recipient of an American Water Environmental Grant.
  • By the time symptoms are obvious, borers may have been at work on a tree for months or years and it may be too late to stop them. Treating while an ash tree still seems healthy may forestall an infestation.
  • Where did the emerald ash borer come from? Listen to this podcast on which Andrea Dierich, Forest Pest Outreach and Survey Project Coordinator at The Morton Arboretum, explains about the origins and life cycle of this insect and how it destroys ash trees.
  • If you have an ash tree, it’s time to make a decision about whether to try to save it from emerald ash borer infestation with insecticide treatments. The Arboretum has a new brochure for homeowners and a new guide for communities on how to deal with this insect scourge attacking one of our most common trees.