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  • Let those leaves lie

    The leaves are falling! It’s time to start the arduous process of raking and bagging leaves, or hire someone to do “fall cleanup” to make the yard tidy.
  • Perennials for pollinators

    What’s the big buzz in gardens today? Planting for pollinators—the bees, butterflies, moths, and other creatures that spread pollen from bloom to bloom. Most flowering plants can’t reproduce without this help from animals. The pollinators depend on a ready food supply, and you can help by planting with them in mind. September is a good time to plant or divide perennials. Try these pollinator-friendly plants, found at the Arboretum but just as much at home in your garden.
  • We'll drink to that: Learn how to grow plants used for making wine or beer

    The flavors of fine wine aren’t just the province of vineyards, although you’ll find some superb flavors at the first-ever Wine and Art Walk, August 27 and 28. Many of the tastes and aromas of the beverages we enjoy come from plants that we can grow in Midwestern gardens.
  • Pick a new spot to plant a new tree

    When a tree has been removed, it may seem obvious to plant a new one in the same place. That’s not a good idea, says Meghan Midgley, soil scientist at The Morton Arboretum: “That’s not likely to be the best place for your new tree to succeed.”
  • Go easy on the fertilizer

    Want to do a little less work in the garden? Reconsider how much you fertilize, says Todd Jacobson, head of horticulture at The Morton Arboretum. Many plants, including trees, shrubs, and most perennials, will usually be fine without it.
  • Father's Day gift guide

    Stumped on what to get your dad this Father's Day? Treat him to one of several great finds available at The Arboretum Store.
  • Living billboard highlights the importance of trees in our communities and world

    Look at the tree one way, and it’s barren and lifeless. Walk a few feet and look at it from another angle, and its leaves become green and lush. What can you do to help trees grow green and thrive? How can you be a tree champion? That’s the question asked by the 10-by-27-foot tree art you can see in Arbor Court this summer.
  • President of The Morton Arboretum receives Arbor Day Foundation's highest honor

    This Arbor Day, Dr. Gerard T. Donnelly, President and CEO of The Morton Arboretum, was recognized with the J. Sterling Morton Award, the highest honor bestowed by the Arbor Day Foundation, a nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees.
  • Pro tips for a great garden design

    Working on a new garden this spring? Before you buy a bevy of plants, take a step back and look at the big picture. That’s what professional landscape designers do, according to Susan Jacobson, FASLA, landscape architect at The Morton Arboretum.
  • Woodland wildflowers are springtime’s dainty treats

    Take a walk on the wilder side of The Morton Arboretum in spring for a once-a-year delight: ephemeral wildflowers. Seizing their moment in the sun before the trees’ leaves open to shade the forest floor, flowers twinkle and shine along paths and roadways all around the Arboretum.
  • Treeologist aims to bring tree science to the public

    The Morton Arboretum has a new kind of scientist on staff: a treeologist. The job, according to the Arboretum's first treeologist, Jessica B. Turner, is to help the public understand the benefits of trees, key concepts about tree science and conservation, and the exciting research underway at the Arboretum.
  • The Song of the Frog

    Peep! Peep! Peep! What’s that high-pitched sound? Are there baby chickens around here? More likely, what you’re hearing on an early spring day at The Morton Arboretum is the mating call of a spring peeper—a tiny frog, about an inch long, that lives near the lakes and marshes. You can hear them in the East Woods or near Crowley Marsh or any water at the Arboretum.
  • Bring the Ribbit! The Exhibit experience home with these froggy finds

    On April 8, we will welcome the 23 larger-than-life frogs of Ribbit! The Exhibit. In celebration, the staff of The Arboretum Store has been on the hunt for unique frog-themed products for the home and garden. Shoppers are also invited to head to the store's children's section for fun items for all ages.
  • Construction begins at South Farm

    As part of the Growing Brilliantly Campaign, the Arboretum is constructing new facilities at South Farm, a staff work area located to the southwest of the Visitor Center.
  • Warm spells don’t mean it’s time to garden

    Early spring in Chicago often brings spells of warm weather. But that doesn’t mean it’s time to start gardening, says Doris Taylor, Plant Clinic manager at The Morton Arboretum.
  • Watch out for winter burn

    As spring arrives, you may start to notice brown patches on some evergreen shrubs. They’re likely to become more noticeable against the green of the garden as leaves open on other plants.
  • Poems for Tree Lovers

    February is a time for love and poetry. So we thought we’d share some of our favorite poetry about the love of trees.

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  • Gifts for a gardener

    Drop by The Arboretum Store at The Morton Arboretum to find a distinctive, inspiring, or useful gift for your favorite gardener for the 2015 holiday season.
  • The Arboretum embarks on a project to renew the DuPage River

    Visitors to The Morton Arboretum in November and December will likely start to see something that has been hidden for years: the banks of the DuPage River.
  • Arboretum arborists take home top spots in tree climbing competition

    Congratulations to The Morton Arboretum's arborists Beau Nagan and Brandon Dobnick who took home first and third place overall in the Illinois Arborist Association Tree Climbing Competition Master's Challenge.