tree science

Ecological Succession: Building a Forest in 8 Steps
Do you want to build a forest? Well, I'm here to give you the recipe in 8 simple steps. It will require a lot of ecological succession, or change over time. We'll start with a disaster. Perhaps a fiery tornado has torn through the land and nothing remains, or maybe you want a forest on a lava flow. The first step is to allow primary successors to colonize the land. These are the things that can live on seemingly nothing, think lichen. Then perennials will move in, annuals, small trees, and soon enough you'll have a forest!
Lights, Camera, Action!
These past few week I have been working on setting the stage for my experiment. My project has changed a bit since my first post, and I am now studying the impact of an injury on the rate of sap flow in Pin oaks. Choosing the trees and installing the sap flow meters was a process that was completely new to me.
Tools, Tech, and Tests
Even though field work is a lot of fun, there's also a lot of cool tools, technologies, and techniques for lab work and analyses!
The Art of Roots
A main portion of my research this summer is analyzing root exudation. This analysis measures the amount of carbon put into the soil by the tree roots. It is an important below ground process that contributes to overall soil health and tree health.
Another Day at the Office
My office is the great outdoors. The view from my "desk" is the beautiful clear blue skies and bright green leaves of the trees. The fresh air keeps me energized as I wonder the forest collecting soil samples and analyzing root systems.
Introduction: Into the Forest
The summer'17 undergraduate research fellowship has been underway for almost a month now, and I am excited to share all my struggles, discoveries, and accomplishments! Stay Tuned.
Adventures in the Field
Learn about my project and first few collecting trips
Wrapping up the Summer at the Morton Arboretum
It’s hard to believe that the summer is almost over and the Undergraduate Research Fellowship is coming to a close. I'll use this final blog post to tell you about the results of the science I did here this summer and how this fellowship impacted me as a scientist and a person.
Stubbornness and Flexibility
Over the past two weeks, I have come to realized the importance of finding a balance between getting things done and accepting that not everything goes according to plan.
Science is BIG! (and small)
Hello there blog readers! I have been doing a lot of lab work in the past few weeks. I decided to use this blog post to tell you about the BIG and the small of my project.

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