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TREES & plants

Tree and plant descriptions

  • Inkberry

    Ilex glabra
    Inkberry holly is a colony-forming, east coast native shrub for low, wet sites. Can be used as a foundation planting, hedge or in mass. Prefers acidic soils. The flowers are not showy, but the black fruits can be seen well into winter. Hollies have separate male and female plants, requires a male plant to pollinate the female plant so it can produce fruits.
  • Inland shadbush

    Amelanchier interior
    Inland shadbush is related to serviceberry and offers similar ornamental features (white flowers, small red berries, excellent fall color). This species may be difficult to find in nurseries.
  • Ironwood

    Ostrya virginiana
    Ironwood is a tough understory tree with beautiful birch-like leaves, grayish-brown flaky bark, fine-textured drooping branches, and attractive hop-like fruits. Ironwood is considered one of Illinois' toughest native hardwoods and is not only ornamental but resistant to many disease and insect problems. Excellent tree for naturalized landscapes.
  • Jack pine

    Pinus banksiana
    Jack pine is very hardy and well suited to northern climates. It can be used in windbreaks, although it is susceptible to ice storm damage and may be difficult to find in nurseries.
  • Japanese barberry

    Berberis thunbergii

    A common sight in yards and gardens throughout eastern North America, this Asian shrub is invasive and should not be planted. Growing three to six feet tall, it is most easily identified by its small, rounded leaves, spiny stems, and red berries that develop in summer. Birds and rodents eat the fruits and distribute the seeds widely. Its branches form roots when in contact with the soil.

  • Japanese black pine

    Pinus thunbergii
    Japanese black pine has a striking, irregular form accented by its dark, lustrous green needles. This Asian native is very tolerant of salt spray and soil salt, but It may be difficult to find in nurseries.
  • Japanese cornel

    Cornus officinalis
    Japanese cornel is very similar to the popular cornelian-cherry dogwood (Cornus mas). It has the same bright yellow flowers in early spring, followed by oblong cherry-red fruits. Flowering occurs slightly earlier on this species and the form is more open. It can be grown as a large shrub or small tree.
  • Japanese flowering cherry

    Prunus serrulata
    Japanese flowering cherry is an Asian species known more for its cultivars. The actual species is seldom sold. The cultivars produce showy flowers in spring and some good leaf color in autumn.
  • Japanese flowering crabapple

    Malus floribunda
    A small ornamental tree known for its showy, bright pink buds that open to fragrant white flowers. Japanese flowering crabapple has an irregular, spreading branch habit as it ages, showy, persistent yellow-red fruits, and good disease resistance. Use as a specimen tree, in small groups, or a mixed border.
  • Japanese Flowering Quince

    Chaenomeles japonica
    A low-growing, spring-flowering shrub with dark green shiny leaves. Growth habit changes with cultivars often reaching 3 to 4 foot high. Bright orange-scarlet flowers appear after the leaves emerge. Most stems have thorns, so avoid planting near sidewalk and heavy traffic areas.