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TREES & plants

Tree and plant descriptions

  • American holly

    Ilex opaca
    American holly is a broad-leaved evergreen tree reaching 40 to 50 feet high, densely pyramidal in youth becoming more open and symmetrically conical with age. The dark green, elliptical leaves have several spiny teeth along the leaf margin. Plants grow best in low, acid pH soils in part shade. Avoid windy sites. Trees are either male or female and require several to get fruit production.
  • American hornbeam

    Carpinus caroliniana
    The American hornbeam is a native forest understory tree in the Chicago area, making it useful for shady landscapes and naturalized or woodland gardens. New leaves emerge reddish-purple, changing to dark green, then turn yellow to orange-red in the fall, offering a kaleidoscope of color throughout the year.
  • American Sentry® linden

    Tilia americana 'Mck Sentry'
    The American Sentry linden is reported to have some resistance to Japanese beetle. It is a dense shade tree with heart-shaped leaves and fragrant flowers; this cultivar is particularly symmetrical.
  • Amur cherry

    Prunus maackii
    Amur cherry is an ornamental tree native to Manchuria, Siberia, and Korea. It has beautiful amber to reddish-brown flaking bark; clusters of fragrant, white hanging flowers in spring; and red maturing to black fruit.
  • Amur corktree (male only)

    Phellodendron amurense (male only)
    Amur corktree can be invasive. Look for male cultivars which do not produce the messy fruit that females do.
  • Amur maackia

    Maackia amurensis
    Amur maackia is a compact, rounded tree for smaller landscapes. The compound leaves emerge silvery-green in spring changing to medium green in summer. White, spiky flowers appear in mid-summer when little else is flowering and showy, mottled olive-green bark adds to winter interest.
  • Amur maple (Not recommended)

    Acer ginnala
    Amur maple has invasive traits that enable it to spread aggressively. This tree is under observation and may be listed on official invasive species lists in the near future. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this tree for planting sites.
  • Angelica tree

    Aralia elata
    Plant advice from The Morton Arboretum: This unusual plant is hard to define. It grows tall enough in the wild to be a tree, but is often a large shrub in landscapes. Large clusters of tiny white flowers appear in late summer followed by small, black fruit. Stems are thorny. Angelica tree has become invasive in a few areas.
  • Anglo-Japanese yew

    Taxus x media
    This name covers a number of very popular hybrids between English and Japanese yew species that have many purposes in the landscape. These shrubs often are used as specimens, foundation plants, in groups, or sheared as a hedge.
  • Apple serviceberry

    Amelanchier x grandiflora
    Apple serviceberry is a wonderful four-season tree with white flowers in the spring, blue-green leaves that turn red in the fall, blue-black edible berries, and smooth silver-gray bark. Excellent for a woodland garden, naturalized setting, or as a specimen plant in a garden.