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TREES & plants

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  • Green hawthorn (Crataegus viridis)

    Also known as: green hawthorn

    Green hawthorn offers beautiful flowers and fruit and is more disease resistant than other species of hawthorn. The cultivar 'Winter King' is more commonly sold than the species.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Green-stemmed Forsythia (Forsythia viridissima)

    Also known as: Green-stemmed forsythia, greenstem forsythia, Korean forsythia

    Green-stemmed forsythia, sometimes called Korean forsythia is an upright, flat-topped shrub reaching 6 to 10 feet high and wide. Bright, 1-inch yellow flowers have a slight green tinge and appear a few weeks after other forsythia. Green-stemmed forsythia is one of the parents for the popular Forsythia x intermedia cultivars.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet), 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Groundsel-tree (Baccharis halimifolia)

    Also known as: groundsel-tree; groundsel-bush; groundseltree; eastern baccharis

    Groundsel-tree is a fast-growing, large shrub with stiff, finely densed, spreading branches. Silver-gray foliage turns a purplish-red in fall. Native to southern U.S. coastal areas. Highly salt tolerant. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)

    Also known as: hackberry

    The hackberry is a Chicago-area native and a sturdy, tolerant shade tree for streets and parkways, or parks and other large areas. Its fleshy, purple-brown berries ripen in late summer and persist through winter.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Hardhack (Spiraea tomentosa (syn. Spiraea tomentosa var rosea))

    Also known as: Hardhack, Canada-tea, Steeplebush

    Hardhack or Steeplebush spirea is a colony-forming native shrub found in acidic, boggy areas. Prefers a cool climate in upper Midwest. All parts of plant have a hairy, rusty appearance. Best used in sunny, wet landscapes. Can be purchased through local native plant nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Hardy kiwi (Actinidia arguta)

    Also known as: hardy kiwi, bower actinidia, tara vine

    Hardy kiwi is an ornamental twining vine that also produces edible fruit. The fruit are smaller that the kiwis sold in stores. Fruit production requires a male and a female plant.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hardy kiwi (Actinidia kolomikta)

    Also known as: Hardy kiwi, Kolomikta kiwi, Kolomikta actinidia

    The hardy kiwi vine will twist and spiral up any support, but is best placed in a site where it can enjoy partial shade to avoid sun scorch.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hardy rubber-tree (Eucommia ulmoides)

    Also known as: hardy rubber-tree, hardy rubber tree

    Hardy rubber-tree, a native of China, can be used in the landscape as a shade tree. It has an attractive round to broad-spreading form, but little else in the way of ornamental interest. During summer, the thick leaves are a very glossy green.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Heart-leaved foamflower (Tiarella cordifolia)

    Also known as: Heart-leaved foamflower, foamflower, foam flower

    This dainty perennial earns its name from the delicate clusters of white flowers that rise above the almost maple-like foliage. This is a good plant for shady gardens.

    Size Range: 
    • Small plant (6-12 inches), 
    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Hedge Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lucida)

    Also known as: Hedge cotoneaster, Peking cotoneaster

    Hedge cotoneaster is an upright shrub with spreading branches reaching 8 to 10 feet high. Attractive dark green foliage turns a yellow to red in the fall. Makes an excellent screen or tall hedge. Attractive black fruit persist into winter.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hedge maple (Not recommended) (Acer campestre)

    Also known as: hedge maple, field maple

    Hedge maples have invasive traits that enable them to spread aggressively. While these trees have demonstrated invasive traits, there is insufficient supporting research to declare them so pervasive that they cannot be recommended for any planting sites. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting these trees for planting sites.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hesse cotoneaster (Cotoneaster 'Hessei')

    Also known as: Cotoneaster, Hesse cotoneaster

    Hesse cotoneaster is a hybrid between Cotoneaster horizontalis and Cotoneaster adpressus var. praecox. This low-growing cotoneaster was selected by The Morton Arboretum and introduced through the Chicagoland Grows™ introduction program. Hesse cotoneaster makes a wonderful ground cover, draped over a wall, or used in mass.

    Size Range: 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Higan cherry (Prunus subhirtella)

    Also known as: Higan cherry, rosebud cherry, spring cherry

    Higan cherry is a small- to medium-sized tree known for its early pink to white flowers in spring. The weeping form is most popular in the nursery trade.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)

    Also known as: Highbush blueberry; Swamp blueberry

    Highbush blueberry is an acid-loving, medium-sized shrub for extremely wet sites. Clusters of white urn-shaped spring flowers, edible blue fruit, and reddish fall color add year-round appeal.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Hill's oak (Quercus ellipsoidalis)

    Also known as: Hill's oak, northern pin oak

    Hill's oak, a Chicago-region native, is very similar in appearance to pin oak, but has the advantage of tolerating a higher soil pH. This means that the chlorosis (yellowing) that is common in pin oak is not a problem for Hill's oak. Hill's oak can be used in parkways and has excellent fall color.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Himalayan birch (Not recommended) (Betula utilis (Betula jacquemontii, Betula utilis var jacquemontii))

    Also known as: Himalayan birch, white-barked Himalayan birch, whitebarked Himalayan birch,

    Due to susceptibility to bronze birch borer (BBB), Himalayan birch is not recommended for planting anywhere in this region and usually require removal and/or replacement. Himalayan birch has yellow fall color.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hinoki-cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa)

    Also known as: Hinoki-cypress, Hinoki falsecypress, Japanese cypress

    Hinoki-cypress has dark green needles on graceful spreading branches that droop at the ends and attractive red peeling bark. A number of dwarf and compact cultivars add accent to the garden.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet), 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet), 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hoary Bluebeard (Caryopteris incana)

    Also known as: Hoary bluebeard

    An open, loose woody shrub reaching 2 to 3 feet tall with violet-blue flowers in late summer and fragrant, silvery-green foliage. Though hoary bluebeard is technically a shrub, it should be treated as a perennial in the Midwest because it tends to die back in harsh winters.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet), 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Honey-locust (Gleditsia triacanthos)

    Also known as: honey-locust, honeylocust

    The native species of honey-locust has large thorns on its stems and bark. For this reason, thornless honey locust, also known as Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis, is most commonly sold. For the sake of species diversity, it should only be planted after careful consideration of alternatives.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet), 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)

    Also known as: horse-chestnut, horse chestnut, common horse-chestnut

    Horse chestnut is a large tree known for showy flowers in May. The clusters of white flowers may be 6 inches tall or more. This non-native can be messy when its fruit drops and offers little in the way of fall color.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hyacinth bean (ANNUAL VINE) (Lablab purpureus (syn. Dolichos lablab))

    Also known as: Hyacinth bean, lablab, Indian bean, Egyptian bean

    Hyacinth bean is an annual vine that offers both attractive flowers and fruits. The purple pea-type flowers will produce bean 'pods' that are magenta colored.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hybrid catalpa (Catalpa erubescens)

    Also known as: hybrid catalpa

    Hybrid catalpa is the result of a cross between the Chinese catalpa and the native southern catalpa. Like other catalpas, this tree has showy white flowers in spring, followed by bean-like seed pods.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hybrid flowering dogwood (Cornus x rutgersensis (C. florida x C. kousa))

    Also known as: hybrid flowering dogwood

    Hybrid flowering dogwood, a cross between flowering dogwood and Kousa dogwood, is represented by several cultivars in the trade. Most are white-flowered (Stellar Pink® has pink flowers). These cultivars are resistant to dogwood borer and dogwood anthracnose (a serious disease).

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hybrid leatherleaf viburnum (Viburnum x rhytidophylloides)

    Also known as: Hybrid leatherleaf viburnum, Lantanaphyllum viburnum

    Leatherleaf viburnum is a hybrid cross between Wayfaringtree and leatherleaf viburnum. A semi-evergreen large shrub used for background borders, screening or specimen plantings.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Hybrid witch-hazels (Hamamelis x intermedia)

    Also known as: witch-hazel, witch hazel, hybrid witch hazel, hybrid witch-hazel

    A number of hybrids have been bred between Chinese witch-hazel (Hamamelis mollis) and Japanese witch-hazel (Hamamelis japonica). These large shrubs have interesting ribbon-like flowers, in shades of yellow to red, in late winter or very early spring before the leaves appear.

    Size Range: 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans)

    Also known as: Indian grass, wood grass, yellow Indian grass

    Indian grass is one of the grasses of the tallgrass prairie and is native to much of North America. It is a warm season, clumping grass. Flowering occurs in late summer but the plant remains attractive into winter.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Indigo-bush (Amorpha fruticosa)

    Also known as: indigo-bush; indigobush; false-indigo; desert indigo-bush; indigo bush amorpha; bastard indigo

    Indigo-bush is a medium to large, finely textured, native shrub for wet to dry soils. The 1-foot long, compound leaves are a gray-green. The long-blooming, showy, 3 to 6-inch long, upright flower spikes are royal purple with yellow -orange anthers. A cousin of the shorter prairie lead plant. Plants may be short-lived.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Inkberry (Ilex glabra)

    Also known as: Inkberry, Gallberry

    Inkberry holly is a colony-forming, east coast native shrub for low, wet sites. Can be used as a foundation planting, hedge or in mass. Prefers acidic soils. The flowers are not showy, but the black fruits can be seen well into winter. Hollies have separate male and female plants, requires a male plant to pollinate the female plant so it can produce fruits.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Inland shadbush (Amelanchier interior)

    Also known as: inland shadbush

    Inland shadbush is related to serviceberry and offers similar ornamental features (white flowers, small red berries, excellent fall color). This species may be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Ironwood (Ostrya virginiana)

    Also known as: ironwood, American hophornbeam, eastern hophornbeam, hop-hornbeam

    Ironwood is a tough understory tree with beautiful birch-like leaves, grayish-brown flaky bark, fine-textured drooping branches, and attractive hop-like fruits. Ironwood is considered one of Illinois' toughest native hardwoods and is not only ornamental but resistant to many disease and insect problems. Excellent tree for naturalized landscapes.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet), 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

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