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TREES & plants

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  • Shantung maple (Acer truncatum)

    Also known as: Shantung maple, purpleblow maple

    Shantung maple, an Asian species, makes a good specimen or street tree. It is also small enough to use under power lines. The glossy foliage emerges with a reddish color and then changes to a dark green. In fall, the foliage takes on shades of yellow, orange, red and even some purple.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Shellbark hickory (Carya laciniosa)

    Also known as: shellbark hickory, big shellbark hickory, kingnut hickory, big-leaved shagbark hickory

    Shellbark hickory is a large tree with shaggy bark and good yellow fall color. It has a deep taproot, so it is difficult to transplant. The nuts produced are edible.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Shingle oak (Quercus imbricaria)

    Also known as: shingle oak, laurel oak, small-leaved oak

    Shingle oak is native to Illinois and to part of the Chicago region. This tree is not easily recognized as an oak due to an atypical, unlobed leaf. It is not used as commonly as other oak species, but would be valuable as a parkway tree.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Shining sumac (Rhus copallina)

    Also known as: Shining sumac, flameleaf Sumac, winged sumac

    Shining sumac is a very adaptable,large, colony-forming shrub to small tree used in groups in the shrub border, as a large bank cover or in naturalizing areas. The shining dark green foliage turns a flaming red to red-purple in the fall. In addition, female plants produce terminal clusters of greenish-yellow flowers that mature into clusters of small, red hairy fruits in September and October. An excellent plant for poor dry soils.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Showy cotoneaster (Cotoneaster multiflora)

    Also known as: Showy cotoneaster, Many-flowered cotoneaster

    Showy cotoneaster is a useful ornamental shrub for a mixed border, in mass, for screening, or as a single specimen. Abundant clusters of small, white flowers cover the showy cotoneaster in spring. In fall, the shrub’s yellow-tinted foliage acts as a backdrop for the showy red fruit. Plant showy cotoneaster in full sun to ensure an outstanding display.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Shrub Bush-Clover (Lespedeza bicolor)

    Also known as: Shrub bush-clover, shrub bush clover, bush clover, shrub bushclover

    Lespedeza bicolor is a large, upright, open shrub that dies back to the ground in northern climates. The rosy-purple flowers appear on new wood at branch tips and leaf axils. Native to China but has naturalized in many parts of the southern U.S. where it is considered invasive in wooded areas. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet), 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Shrub Rose hybrids (Rosa hybrids)

    Also known as: Hybrid shrub rose, Knock out rose, Carefree rose

    Shrub roses are one of the most reliable and popular roses available. They are long blooming, come in many colors, low maintenance and feature good resistance to disease. The Knockout® series and the Carefree™ series withstand hot, humid summers and cold winters of the Midwest.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Shrubby Cinquefoil (Potentilla fruiticosa)

    Also known as: Shrubby Cinquefoil, Bush Cinquefoil, Potentilla

    Shrubby cinquefoil is a dense, bushy shrub with upright, slender branches. The species produces bright yellow flowers throughout the the growing season. Cultivars come in a wide range of flower colors. An excellent choice for hot, dry sites.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet), 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Shrubby St. John's Wort (Hypericum prolificum)

    Also known as: Shrubby St. John's Wort

    Shrubby St. John's wort is a low to medium-sized native shrub reaching 3 to 4 feet high. The bright yellow flowers with a profusion of yellow stamens look like fireworks. The exfoliating bark and attractive seed capsules add winter interest to the landscape.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Shumard's oak (Quercus shumardii)

    Also known as: Shumard's oak, swamp red oak

    Shumard's oak is native to southern Illinois, but is hardy in the northern part of the state as well. This species can be utilized as a street tree, but may be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Siberian Dogwood (Cornus alba)

    Also known as: Siberian dogwood, Tatarian dogwood

    Siberian dogwood may not have the showiest flowers but it adds a nice spring color to the landscape. Prized for its dark green summer foliage, red winter stems and bluish white fruit. Best suited moist areas along a stream or pond edge and in shrub borders.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Siberian elm (Not receommended) (Ulmus pumila)

    Also known as: Siberian elm, Chinese elm, littleleaf elm

    Siberian elms have invasive traits that enable them to spread aggressively. While these trees have demonstrated invasive traits, there is insufficient supporting research to declare them so pervasive that they cannot be recommended for any planting sites. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting these trees for planting sites.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Siberian frost grass (Spodiopogon sibiricus)

    Also known as: Siberian frost grass, frost grass, Siberian graybeard, silver spikegrass

    Siberian frost grass is a warm-season, clump-forming grass with a neat, upright to rounded form. It grows up to four feet tall and has erect flower clusters in mid- to late summer.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Siberian pea-shrub (Caragana arborescens (fruticosa))

    Also known as: Siberian pea-shrub; Siberian peashrub

    Siberian pea-shrub is a hardy, sun-loving, large shrub tolerant of drought, wind, deer and varying soil conditions. Prized for its light green, ferny-like foliage and bright yellow spring flowers.

    Size Range: 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Siberian-cypress (Microbiota decussata)

    Also known as: Siberian-cypress, Russian-arborvitae, Siberian cypress, Russian arborvitae

    Siberian-cypress is a low spreading, soft-textured evergreen shrub or ground cover. The fan-like, feathery branchlets appear on drooping branches. In late fall the medium green leaves turn a burgundy to bronze color adding interest to the winter landscape. Can be used as a single specimen, planted in mass, or to help stabilize a slope.

    Size Range: 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Side oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula)

    Also known as: Side oats grama, mesquite grass, tall grama grass

    Side oats grama was a common grass in both the tallgrass and shortgrass prairies even though it is a shorter grass (about 2 to 2 1/2 feet). It is most often found in drier areas away from the shade of the taller grasses. It is a warm season grass and considered a clumping grass, even though it does send out short rhizomes.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Siebold viburnum (Viburnum sieboldii)

    Also known as: Siebold viburnum

    This large shrub or small tree has glossy dark green leaves with toothed edges. In May creamy-white flowers are followed by clusters of red berries. The shiny dark green leaves turn burgundy in fall.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Siebold's Shrub-Ginseng (Eleutherococcus sieboldianus (Syn. Acanthopanax sieboliana))

    Also known as: Siebold's shrub-ginseng, Siebold shrub ginseng, Fiveleaf Aralia

    Siebold's shrub-ginseng, also known as 5-leaved aralia, is an upright, deciduous shrub reaching 8 to 10 foot high and wide. Medium green, pamately compound leaves hold late into fall. Stout gray arching stems have thorns making it a good barrier shrub.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Silky dogwood (Cornus amomum)

    Also known as: silky dogwood

    Silky dogwood is a large to medium-sized native shrub with creamy white spring flowers, dark green foliage, and reddish stems and burgundy fall color. A great 4-season plant for naturalizing, in mass, and in shrub borders, especially in moist sites.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Silver banner grass (Miscanthus sacchariflorus )

    Also known as: Silver banner grasss, Amur silver grass, Japanese silver grass, Chinese silver grass

    Silver banner grass (Miscanthus sacchariflorus) is similar in appearance to the miscanthus often used in gardens (Miscanthus sinensis), but is far more aggressive. It is a spreading plant that can colonize and quickly overtake a yard. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this grass.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Silver lace vine (Fallopia aubertii (syn. Polygonum aubertii))

    Also known as: Silver lace vine, silver fleece vine

    Silver lace vine is a beautiful flowering vine, but it is an aggressive grower and is becoming an invasive plant in some areas. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this vine for planting sites.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Silver linden (Tilia tomentosa)

    Also known as: silver linden

    Silver linden has leaves that are dark green above and silvery-white below. It can be used as a street tree.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Silver maple (Acer saccharinum)

    Also known as: silver maple, swamp maple, water maple, silverleaf maple, white maple, soft maple

    Silver maple is a tall, fast-growing, native tree of eastern North America. It is usually found growing in open sunlight along creeks and waterways. This species has become over planted. Without proper and frequent pruning high winds and ice can cause limbs to break. Many authorities recommend against planting silver maple.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Silver-leaved Hydrangea (Hydrangea radiata)

    Also known as: Silver-leaved hydrangea

    Silver-leaved hydrangea is an attractive shrub native to Appalachia. It has lacecap clusters of flowers in early summer that emerge green and change to white. Its distinctive characteristic is the silvery underside of its leaves. Silver-leaved hydrangea is somewhat sensitive to drought, so it needs a site with moist soil. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Silverbell (Halesia carolina)

    Also known as: silverbell, Carolina silverbell, small-flowered silverbell

    Silverbell is a medium-sized tree that produces white bell-shaped flowers in spring. The flowers are followed by dry fruits with four wings. This tree may be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Single-seeded hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)

    Also known as: single-seeded hawthorn, oneseed hawthorn, common hawthorn

    Single-seeded hawthorn, like other hawthorns, bears white flowers in spring, followed by red fruits. Unlike other hawthorns, the flowers are sweetly scented (most hawthorn flowers have an "off" odor).

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis)

    Also known as: Sitka spruce

    The Sitka spruce is one of North America's largest conifers, able to reach mature heights of 200 feet or more. This species is found primarily along the western coast of North America and requires the high moisture and high humidity found in that environment. While this is a majestic tree it is not recommended for Midwestern landscapes.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Slender Deutzia (Deutzia gracilis)

    Also known as: Slender deutzia

    Slender arching stems covered in clusters of white flowers grace this shrub in late spring. Use in front of border, edging a walkway, or in groups. A yearly pruning is needed to keep deutzia looking tidy.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Slippery elm (Not recommended) (Ulmus rubra)

    Also known as: slippery elm

    Due to susceptibility to Dutch elm disease (DED), slippery elm is not recommended for planting anywhere in this region and usually require removal and/or replacement.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra)

    Also known as: Smooth Sumac

    Smooth sumac is a native plant found throughout the eastern United States. A good choice for difficult sites, mass plantings, screening and highways plantings. The dark green summer foliage turns an excellent yellow to orange-red-purple combinations in fall. Female plants produce scarlet, hairy terminal fruits in summer and persistent into winter.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

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