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TREES & Plants

Japanese White Pine

Japanese white pine is a dense, slow growing evergreen with a smaller stature which makes it an excellent specimen  for small landscapes or space restrictions.

Botanical name: 
Pinus parviflora
All Common Names: 
Japanese White Pine
Family (English): 
Pine
Family (Botanic): 
Pinaceae
Tree or Plant Type: 
  • Tree
Foliage: 
  • Evergreen (foliage year-round)
Native Locale: 
  • Non-native
Hardiness Zones: 
  • Zone 4
  • Zone 5
  • Zone 6
  • Zone 7
Growth Rate: 
  • Slow
Light Exposure: 
  • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)
Tolerances: 
  • Clay soil
  • Road salt
Soil Preference: 
  • Moist, well-drained soil
Flower Color & Fragrance: 
  • Inconspicuous
Size Range: 
  • Medium tree (25-40 feet)
Shape or Form: 
  • Pyramidal
  • Spreading
Landscape Uses: 
  • Specimen
  • Shade
Time of Year: 
  • Mid winter
  • Late winter
  • Early spring
  • Late spring
More Information: 

Size & Form

A 25 to 50 feet tall and wide evergreen tree 
Young trees are dense and conical, becoming more  flat-topped with age.
Lower branches are shorter than upper branch

Tree & Plant Care

Best in full sun, relatively tolerant of most soils as long as well-drained.
S
omewhat tolerant of salt
Slow growing.

Disease, pests, and problems

Can suffer from insect, disease when stressed.

Native geographic location and habitat

Native to Japan

Bark color and texture 

Smooth, gray-green when young, older bark dark gray, and scaly.

Leaf or needle arrangement, size, shape, and texture

Fine textured, 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches long, bluish-green needles are in bundles of 5.
Needle are stiff and twisted and appear brush-like tufts on strong horizontal branches.

Flower arrangement, shape, and size

Monoecious, small, yellow-green flowers in clusters in May

Japanese white pine (Pinus parviflora)Japanese white pine (Pinus parviflora)photo: John Hagstrom

Fruit, cone, nut, and seed descriptions

The 2 to 4 inch long cylindrical cones are thick, leathery, near terminal ends of branches.
Cones are abundant, even on young trees and persist for years on the tree.