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  • Cornus drummondii (Rough-leaved dogwood)

    Leaves and fruit of rough-leaved dogwood.

    Also known as:

    Rough-leaved dogwood, roughleaf dogwood
    Rough-leaved dogwood is a native large shrub or small tree, often mistaken for gray dogwood. Named for the rough textured leaves, it has fleshy white fruit, dark green foliage that turns burgundy red fall color. Best used for naturalizing in moist areas. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Cornus florida (Flowering dogwood)

    Flowering dogwood in full flower.

    Also known as:

    Flowering dogwood
    Flowering dogwood is a small to medium woodland understory tree, native throughout most of the eastern United States. Showy white, red or pink flowering bracts appear before the leaves in early spring. Dark green summer foliage turns a brilliant reddish purple in fall. It is sensitive to adverse soil and environmental conditions such as road salt and pollution.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood)

    Flowers of kousa dogwood.

    Also known as:

    Kousa dogwood
    Kousa dogwood is an excellent small specimen tree. Two outstanding characteristics are the four-petaled, white flowers that appear above the foliage in June and reddish-purple fall color. In the Midwest, this is a hardier substitute for the acid-loving flowering dogwood. The shallow root system will benefit from a layer of mulch to maintain a cool root environment.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cornus mas (Cornelian-cherry dogwood)

    Flowers of Cornelian-cherry dogwood.

    Also known as:

    cornelian-cherry dogwood, corneliancherry dogwood
    Cornelian-cherry dogwood is a small, 20- to 25-foot-high tree or large shrub that thrives in well-drained urban conditions as a specimen plant, in masses, near a patio, or as a hedge. The tree is native to Europe and Asia.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cornus officinalis (Japanese cornel)

    Japanese cornel flowering in early spring.

    Also known as:

    Japanese cornel, Japanese cornelian-cherry, Asian dogwood
    Japanese cornel is very similar to the popular cornelian-cherry dogwood (Cornus mas). It has the same bright yellow flowers in early spring, followed by oblong cherry-red fruits. Flowering occurs slightly earlier on this species and the form is more open. It can be grown as a large shrub or small tree.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cornus pumila (Dwarf dogwood)

    Early season leaves of dwarf dogwood.

    Also known as:

    Dwarf dogwood, dwarf red-tipped dogwood, dwarf redtwig dogwood
    Dwarf dogwood, also known as red-tipped dogwood, is a small compact, mounded shrub reaching 2 to 3 feet high and 3 to 4 feet wide. New leaves emerge purplish-red leaf and leaf tips remain red as the rest of leaf matures to green. In late spring, abundant clusters of slightly fragrant flowers attract butterflies. The mature black fruit are a favorite of birds. Use in a group or as a low hedge.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cornus racemosa (Gray dogwood)

    Flowers of gray dogwood.

    Also known as:

    Gray dogwood, Panicled dogwood
    Gray dogwood is a very adaptable, native shrub that is excellent for naturalizing, especially in difficult sites, such as pond and stream banks. Although its suckering, spreading habit makes it impractical for formal plantings, it can be incorporated into the shrub border and useful as a mass planting. Creamy white clusters of flowers in May are followed by white berries in late summer that are quickly eaten by birds.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Cornus sanguinea (Blood-twigged dogwood)

    Winter form of the 'Midwinter Fire' cultivar of blood-twigged dogwood.

    Also known as:

    Blood-twigged dogwood, common dogwood, dogberry, European dogwood, bloodtwig dogwood
    Blood-twigged dogwood is a medium-sized shrub, popular mainly for its straight stems and branches, which turn a mix of green and red in winter. It has flat-topped fluffy clusters of white flowers, more smelly than fragrant, in late summer, followed by small black fruit.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cornus sericea subsp. sericea (Red-osier dogwood)

    Winter form of red-osier dogwood.

    Also known as:

    Red-osier dogwood, redosier dogwood, red osier dogwood, red twig dogwood
    Red-osier dogwood is a large erect shrub best suited where the background, such as evergreens, will show off the dark red winter stems. Besides attractive, red stems in the winter, red-osier dogwood has yellowish-white flowers that appear in late May to early June and bluish-white fruit borne in late summer. This species was formerly known as Cornus stolonifera.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Cornus x rutgersensis (C. florida x C. kousa) (Hybrid flowering dogwood)

    Flowers of Aurora, a selection of the hybrid flowering dogwood.

    Also known as:

    hybrid flowering dogwood
    Hybrid flowering dogwood, a cross between flowering dogwood and Kousa dogwood, is represented by several cultivars in the trade. Most are white-flowered (Stellar Pink® has pink flowers). These cultivars are resistant to dogwood borer and dogwood anthracnose (a serious disease).

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Corylopsis spicata (Spiked winter-hazel)

    Early spring flowers of spiked winter-hazel.

    Also known as:

    Spiked winter-hazel, spiked winter hazel
    Spiked winter-hazel is one of the first flowering shrubs in early spring. Profuse, 1- to 2-inch-long pendulous racemes of pale yellow, cup-shaped flowers appear before the leaves. Upright, spreading shrub reaches 5 to 7 feet high, emerging leaves are reddish-purple changing to a blue-green. Excellent in sun or shade. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Corylus americana (American hazelnut)

    Leaves of American hazelnut.

    Also known as:

    American hazelnut, American Filbert, American hazel
    American hazelnut is a thicket-forming native shrub, excellent for naturalizing, woodland gardens and shade areas. Showy male flowers (catkins) add early spring interest, dark green leaves turn a beautiful kaleidoscope of colors in the fall. The nuts mature from September to October, attracting seed-eating birds, such as blue jays and woodpeckers.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Corylus avellana (European hazelnut)

    Leaves of European hazelnut.

    Also known as:

    European hazelnut, European filbert, European hazel, filbert, giant filbert, hazelnut, cobnut
    European hazelnut is often grown as a large shrub, but it can also be used as a small tree. This species produces edible hazelnuts or filberts.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Corylus colurna (Turkish hazelnut)

    Leaves of Turkish hazelnut.

    Also known as:

    Turkish hazelnut, Turkish hazel, Turkish filbert
    Turkish hazelnut is an excellent hardy tree for lawns, street plantings, and urban conditions. Its heavy-textured, dark green foliage is free of insect and disease. This tree is also pH adaptable and tolerant of heat, cold, and drought once it is established.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotinus coggygria (Eurasian smoke tree)

    Yellow fall color of Eurasian smoke tree

    Also known as:

    Eurasian smoke tree, Smoke tree, Smoke bush, Smoketree, Smokebush
    The outstanding feature of Eurasian smoke tree is the large, airy, plume-like stalks that hold the small flowers. These are covered with hairs that provide the appearance of a puff of smoke.

    Size Range:

    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotinus obovatus (American smoke tree)

    Fall color of American smoke tree.

    Also known as:

    American smoke tree, American smoketree, Chittamwood
    American smoke tree (Cotinus obovatus; syn. Cotinus americanus) is a native of North America, but is little used in home landscapes. This small to medium tree produces the same 'smoke' (hairy fruit stalks) as it's Eurasian cousin, smoke bush and also offers excellent fall color.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Cotoneaster 'Hessei' (Hesse cotoneaster)

    Leaves and developing fruit of Hesse cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Cotoneaster, Hesse cotoneaster
    Hesse cotoneaster is a hybrid between Cotoneaster horizontalis and Cotoneaster adpressus var. praecox. This low-growing cotoneaster was selected by The Morton Arboretum and introduced through the Chicagoland Grows™ introduction program. Hesse cotoneaster makes a wonderful ground cover, draped over a wall, or used in mass.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster acutifolia (Peking cotoneaster)

    Also known as:

    Peking cotoneaster
    Peking cotoneaster, often confused with hedge cotoneaster, is a large shrub for back of the border. Small pink flowers and reddish, persistent fruit attract birds and wildlife.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster adpressus (Creeping cotoneaster)

    Creeping cotoneaster growing over a low wall.

    Also known as:

    Creeping cotoneaster, early cotoneaster
    Creeping cotoneaster is a dense, low-growing, spreading shrub used as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or cascading over stone walls. Valued for its tiny white flowers, excellent glossy foliage and attractive red berries.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet),
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster apiculata (Cranberry cotoneaster)

    Leaves of cranberry cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Cranberry cotoneaster
    The stiff, arching branches of the cranberry cotoneaster form an impenetrable mass, making it very effective cascading over a wall, in a shrub border, as a foundation plant, or a ground cover. Small, dark green, glossy leaves and cranberry-red fruit make it a nice addition to the landscape.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster dammeri (Bearberry cotoneaster)

    Leaves of bearberry cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Bearberry cotoneaster
    Bearberry cotoneaster is a low-growing, semi-evergreen shrub reaching 1 to 2 feet high with a 6 feet wide spread. Use in groups on slopes to stabilize soil, ground cover, or front of shrub borders. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet),
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches),
    • Medium plant (12-24 inches),
    • Small plant (6-12 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster divaricatus (Spreading cotoneaster)

    Spreading cotoneaster showing fall color.

    Also known as:

    spreading cotoneaster
    Spreading cotoneaster is a medium-sized, upright shrub with slender, densely branched stems. Tiny pink buds open in May to clusters of white flowers, and glossy, dark green summer foliage turns a kaleidoscope of orange, red, yellow and burgundy.

    Size Range:

    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster horizontalis (Rock cotoneaster)

    Leaves and branch structure of rock cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    rock cotoneaster; rockspray
    Rock cotoneaster is a low spreading shrub often used as a ground cover or left to spill over slopes and ledge walls. The densely branched plant has glossy, dark green foliage, deep red fruits and reddish purple fall color.

    Size Range:

    • Small shrub (3-5 feet),
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster lucida (Hedge cotoneaster)

    Leaves and flower buds of hedge cotoneaster.

    Also known as:

    Hedge cotoneaster, Peking cotoneaster
    Hedge cotoneaster is an upright shrub with spreading branches reaching 8 to 10 feet high. Attractive dark green foliage turns a yellow to red in the fall. Makes an excellent screen or tall hedge. Attractive black fruit persist into winter.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Cotoneaster multiflora (Showy cotoneaster)

    Showy cotoneaster in full flower.

    Also known as:

    Showy cotoneaster, many-flowered cotoneaster
    Showy cotoneaster is a useful ornamental shrub for a mixed border, in mass, for screening, or as a single specimen. Abundant clusters of small, white flowers cover the showy cotoneaster in spring. In fall, the shrub’s yellow-tinted foliage acts as a backdrop for the showy red fruit. Plant showy cotoneaster in full sun to ensure an outstanding display.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Crataegus coccinea (Scarlet hawthorn)

    Leaves of scarlet hawthorn.

    Also known as:

    scarlet hawthorn, red haw, red-fruited hawthorn
    Scarlet hawthorn is a small tree that can be utilized under power lines. It has white flowers in spring followed by red fruit. The tree does bear long thorns.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus crus-galli (Cockspur hawthorn)

    Cockspur hawthorn in full flower.

    Also known as:

    cockspur hawthorn
    Cockspur hawthorn is a Chicago-area native that provides beautiful flowers in spring and persistent fruit in fall and winter. This species should be used with care as it has long thorns and is prone to disease. White flowers in the spring, persistent red fruit, and the orange-red fall color of this Midwestern native make it a nice addition to the four-season landscape.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus crus-galli var. inermis (Thornless cockspur hawthorn)

    Flowers and thornless stems of thornless cockspur hawthorn.

    Also known as:

    thornless cockspur hawthorn
    This variety of cockspur hawthorn has thornless stems. It displays beautiful white flowers in spring and persistent fruit in fall and winter.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Crataegus laevigata (Whitethorn)

    Also known as:

    whitethorn, English hawthorn
    Whitethorn or English hawthorn is a small tree that can be utilized under power lines, but it may be difficult to find in nurseries. Typical of hawthorns, this species has white flowers in spring, followed by red fruits. Stems bear one inch long thorns.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Crataegus mollis (Downy hawthorn)

    A mature downy hawthorn tree.

    Also known as:

    downy hawthorn
    Downy hawthorn has the typical white flowers and red fruit of hawthorns, but is not always as thorny as other species. This native tree is beautiful, but is prone to the cedar rust diseases.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America

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