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TREES & plants

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  • Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (Alaska cedar)

    Also known as: Alaska cedar, Alaska-cedar, yellow cypress, Nootka falsecypress

    Alaska cedar in an interesting medium-sized evergreen tree with gray-green to blue-green foliage that droops from widely spaced branches. Native to moist bottomlands in the Pacific Northwest, it needs consistently moist soil. This plant is also known as false cypress.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet), 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Chamaecyparis obtusa (Hinoki-cypress)

    Also known as: Hinoki-cypress, Hinoki falsecypress, Japanese cypress

    Hinoki-cypress has dark green needles on graceful spreading branches that droop at the ends and attractive red peeling bark. A number of dwarf and compact cultivars add accent to the garden.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet), 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet), 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Chamaecyparis pisifera (Sawara-cypress)

    Also known as: Sawara-cypress, Sawara Falsecypress, Japanese Falsecypress, sawara cypress

    Its pyramidal habit, loose open branching and scale-like, dark green foliage make the sawara-cypress a notable option for specimen plantings or in groups in a large landscape. Besides its remarkable foliage, this evergreen has handsome reddish-brown bark that peels off in strips and tiny, reddish-brown cones on short stalks.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet), 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Chamaecyparis thyoides (Atlantic white-cedar)

    Also known as: Atlantic white-cedar, Swamp white-cedar, Southern white-cedar

    Atlantic white-cedar is an attractive plant, but is not commonly found in landscapes. It may be difficult to find in nurseries as well. This tree requires moist to wet sites and is very intolerant of drought.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Chasmanthium latifolium (Northern sea-oats)

    Also known as: Northern sea-oats, wild oats, wood oats, Indian wood-oats, spangle grass

    Northern sea-oats is a grass native to the southern half of Illinois. This warm season, clumping grass has interesting oat-like seed heads that rustle easily in the wind, adding movement to the garden.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Chionanthus retusus (Chinese fringetree)

    Also known as: Chinese fringetree

    Chinese fringetree is a beautiful multi-stemmed shrub to small tree, very similar in appearance to our native species with exfoliating, gray-brown bark. In mid-spring, erect clusters of fragrant, white flowers are quite showy. Female plants produce dark purple fruits in late summer. The dark green, leathery leaves turn a soft yellow in fall.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Chionanthus virginicus (Fringe tree)

    Also known as: fringe tree, fringetree, old man's beard, white fringetree

    Fringe tree grows as either a wide-spreading, multi-stemmed shrub or a small tree useful in native woodland gardens, as a specimen plant in groups, borders, or near large buildings. The fringe tree's most outstanding feature is the fragrant, strap-like, white flowers that are borne in six to eight-inch long fleecy panicles in late May to early June.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Cladrastis kentukea (Yellowwood)

    Also known as: yellowwood, American yellowwood

    Choose a yellowwood tree for excellent shade in a small- to medium-sized landscape. Note that the branches of the yellowwood are highly susceptible to ice storm damage.

    Size Range: 
    • Large tree (more than 40 feet), 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Clematis terniflora (Sweet autumn clematis)

    Also known as: Sweet autumn clematis

    Sweet autumn clematis is a vine that produces an abundance of small, white flowers in late summer and early autumn. It should be used with care as it is considered invasive in some locations.Also known as Clematis maximowicziana.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Clematis texensis (Scarlet clematis)

    Also known as: Scarlet clematis, Texas clematis

    Scarlet clematis is native only to Texas, but is hardy in more northern climates. The urn-shaped lowers are smaller than many types of clematis and are some shade of scarlet or pink.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Clematis virginiana (Virgin's bower)

    Also known as: Virgin's bower

    Virgin's bower is a native species of clematis that produces masses of small white flowers in late summer.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Clematis viticella (Italian Clematis)

    Also known as: Italian clematis

    Italian clematis is a species of clematis with purple or violet flowers that are shaped like hanging bells.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Clematis x jackmanii (Jackman's clematis and the Jackman group of hybrids)

    Also known as: Jackman's clematis

    Jackman's clematis is a very old and well known clematis with large, dark purple flowers. It is the picture that comes to mind when the word clematis is spoken. There are a number of hybrids derived from this species and they are known as the Jackman group or the Jackman hybrids. These hybrids generally have large flowers.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Clethra alnifolia (Summersweet clethra)

    Also known as: Summersweet clethra, Summersweet, Clethra, Sweet Pepperbush

    A wide variety of butterflies and songbirds are attracted to summersweet clethra for its nectar and seeds. Native to the eastern United States, it has lustrous green leaves in the spring, spiky white or pink fragrant flowers during the summer, golden yellow leaves in the fall, and interesting, delicate dried seed capsules in winter to provide exceptional four-season interest.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet), 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • North America

  • Cobaea scandens (Cup-and-saucer vine (ANNUAL VINE))

    Also known as: Cup-and-saucer vine, missionary bells, cathedral bells

    Cup-and-saucer vine is an easy to grow annual that supplies a quantity of unique flowers from mid-summer on. The flowers do look like little teacups sitting in saucers.

    Size Range: 
    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Comptonia peregrina (Sweet-fern)

    Also known as: Sweet-fern, Sweetfern

    Sweet-fern is a colony-forming, small shrub with wonderfully aromatic fern-like leaves. This shrub is a useful selection in the landscape for erosion control and naturalizing, due to its tolerance of adverse conditions. It is adaptable to poor, infertile soil and is also drought, salt, and heat resistant.

    Size Range: 
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet), 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Convallaria majalis (Lily of the valley)

    Also known as: Lily-of-the-Valley, Lily of the Valley, Lady's tears

    Lily-of-the-valley is an old-fashioned, shade-loving ground cover reaching 6 to 8 inches tall. In mid-spring many bell-shaped, waxy white flowers appear on an erect stalk.

    Size Range: 
    • Small plant (6-12 inches), 
    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus alba (Siberian Dogwood)

    Also known as: Siberian dogwood, Tatarian dogwood

    Siberian dogwood may not have the showiest flowers but it adds a nice spring color to the landscape. Prized for its dark green summer foliage, red winter stems and bluish white fruit. Best suited moist areas along a stream or pond edge and in shrub borders.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus alternifolia (Pagoda dogwood)

    Also known as: Pagoda dogwood, Alternate-leaved dogwood, Alternate-leaf dogwood

    Pagoda dogwood is an excellent native plant for the four season garden. The unique horizontal branching pattern has a distinct tiered habit, often catching snow in the winter. Clusters of white flowers show up in spring, dark green foliage turns a beautiful burgundy-red in fall, and blue-black berries attract many birds.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Cornus amomum (Silky dogwood)

    Also known as: silky dogwood

    Silky dogwood is a large to medium-sized native shrub with creamy white spring flowers, dark green foliage, and reddish stems and burgundy fall color. A great 4-season plant for naturalizing, in mass, and in shrub borders, especially in moist sites.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Cornus drummondii (Rough-leaved dogwood)

    Also known as: Rough-leaved dogwood, roughleaf dogwood

    Rough-leaved dogwood is a native large shrub or small tree, often mistaken for gray dogwood. Named for the rough textured leaves, it has fleshy white fruit, dark green foliage that turns burgundy red fall color. Best used for naturalizing in moist areas. May be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Cornus florida (Flowering dogwood)

    Also known as: flowering dogwood

    Flowering dogwood is a small to medium woodland understory tree, native throughout most of the eastern United States. Showy white, red or pink flowering bracts appear before the leaves in early spring. Dark green summer foliage turns a brilliant reddish purple in fall. It is sensitive to adverse soil and environmental conditions such as road salt and pollution.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood)

    Also known as: Kousa dogwood

    Kousa dogwood is an excellent small specimen tree. Two of this plant's outstanding characteristics are four-petaled, white flowers that appear above the foliage in June and reddish-purple fall color. This tree benefits from a layer of mulch to maintain a cool root environment.

    Size Range: 
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet), 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus mas (Cornelian-cherry dogwood)

    Also known as: cornelian-cherry dogwood, corneliancherry dogwood

    Cornelian-cherry dogwood is a small, 20- to 25-foot-high tree or large shrub that thrives in well-drained urban conditions as a specimen plant, in masses, near a patio, or as a hedge. The tree is native to Europe and Asia.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet), 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus officinalis (Japanese cornel)

    Also known as: Japanese cornel, Japanese cornelian-cherry, Asian dogwood

    Japanese cornel is very similar to the popular cornelian-cherry dogwood (Cornus mas). It has the same bright yellow flowers in early spring, followed by oblong cherry-red fruits. Flowering occurs slightly earlier on this species and the form is more open. It can be grown as a large shrub or small tree.

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus pumila (Dwarf Dogwood)

    Also known as: Dwarf dogwood, Dwarf red-tipped dogwood, Dwarf redtwig dogwood

    Dwarf dogwood, also known as red tipped dogwood is a small compact, mounded shrub reaching 2 to 3 feet high and 3 to 4 feet wide. New leaves emerge purplish-red leaf and leaf tips remain red as the rest of leaf matures to green. In late spring, abundant clusters of slightly fragrant flowers attract butterflies. The mature black fruit are a favorite of birds. Use in a group or as a low hedge.

    Size Range: 
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus racemosa (Gray dogwood)

    Also known as: Gray dogwood, Panicled dogwood

    Gray dogwood is a very adaptable, native shrub that is excellent for naturalizing, especially in difficult sites, such as pond and stream banks. Although its suckering, spreading habit makes it impractical for formal plantings, it can be incorporated into the shrub border and useful as a mass planting. Creamy white clusters of flowers in May are followed by white berries in late summer that are quickly eaten by birds.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily), 
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Cornus sanguinea (Blood-twigged dogwood)

    Also known as: Blood-twigged dogwood, common dogwood, dogberry, European dogwood, bloodtwig dogwood

    Blood-twigged dogwood is a medium-sized shrub, popular mainly for its straight stems and branches, which turn a mix of green and red in winter. It has flat-topped fluffy clusters of white flowers, more smelly than fragrant, in late summer, followed by small black fruit.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

  • Cornus sericea subsp. sericea (Red-osier dogwood)

    Also known as: Red-osier dogwood, redosier dogwood, red osier dogwood, red twig dogwood

    Red-osier dogwood is a large erect shrub best suited where the background, such as evergreens, will show off the dark red winter stems. Besides attractive, red stems in the winter, red-osier dogwood has yellowish-white flowers that appear in late May to early June and bluish-white fruit borne in late summer. This species was formerly known as Cornus stolonifera.

    Size Range: 
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet), 
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Chicago area, 
    • Illinois, 
    • North America

  • Cornus x rutgersensis (C. florida x C. kousa) (Hybrid flowering dogwood)

    Also known as: hybrid flowering dogwood

    Hybrid flowering dogwood, a cross between flowering dogwood and Kousa dogwood, is represented by several cultivars in the trade. Most are white-flowered (Stellar Pink® has pink flowers). These cultivars are resistant to dogwood borer and dogwood anthracnose (a serious disease).

    Size Range: 
    • Small tree (15-25 feet), 
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet)

    Light Exposure: 
    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily), 
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale: 
    • Non-native

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