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  • Taxus cuspidata (Japanese yew)

    Japanese yew
    Japanese yews are a popular and versatile evergreen shrub. They make a good foundation or accent plant and dark green leaves make good background for colorful shrubs and perennials. There are numerous cultivars available, varying greatly in size, so choose carefully to find the right one for your site. Be aware that the leaves, seeds, and bark of yews are poisonous.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Taxus media (Anglo-Japanese yew)

    Ango-Japanese yew, Anglojap yew, English yew, Japanese yew
    Anglo-Japanese yew is a very popular hybrid between English and Japanese yew species often used as hedges, specimens and foundation plants. Hardy and resilient, yews are very tolerant of urban conditions and are one of the few evergreens that tolerate heavy shade.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Thuja occidentalis (Eastern arborvitae)

    Eastern arborvitae, Northern white cedar, Eastern white cedar, American arborvitae
    The eastern arborvitae is an extremely common evergreen tree or shrub, used often as a specimen, in hedges, or for privacy. The small cones open up to look like small flowers and appeal to birds. There are many cultivars that vary in height and other characteristics. On some varieties, the foliage may discolor in winter.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet),
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet),
    • Small shrub (3-5 feet),
    • Low-growing shrub (under 3 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Thuja plicata (Giant arborvitae)

    giant arborvitae, western arborvitae
    Giant arborvitae is a dense, stately evergreen tree native to the Pacific Northwest, often used as a specimen or for screening. The fresh green foliage consists of flat sprays formed by overlapping scales. The tree supplies seeds and shelter for birds but is less appealing to deer. There are many cultivars that vary in height and other characteristics. On some varieties, the foliage changes color in winter.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet),
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Thunbergia alata (Black-eyed Susan vine (ANNUAL VINE))

    Black-eyed Susan vine
    Black-eyed Susan vine is an annual vines with orange-yellow flowers that resemble black-eyed Susans. This vine is an annual and climbs by twining.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Thymus praecox (Creeping thyme)

    Creeping thyme, woolly thyme, mother of thyme
    Creeping time is generally used more as a ground cover than as an herb. This low-growing fuzzy plant spreads out in a mat and is covered with beautiful flowers.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Thymus serphyllum (Mother-of -thyme)

    Mother-of-thyme, wild thyme, creeping thyme, creeping red thyme
    While thyme is usually thought of as an herb, this species is used as a ground cover, rather than for cooking. Well-drained soil is a must for this plant.

    Size Range:

    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Tiarella cordifolia (Heart-leaved foamflower)

    Heart-leaved foamflower, foamflower, foam flower
    This dainty perennial earns its name from the delicate clusters of white flowers that rise above the almost maple-like foliage. This is a good plant for shady gardens.

    Size Range:

    • Small plant (6-12 inches),
    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Tilia americana (American basswood)

    American basswood, American linden, basswood
    American basswood is native to the Chicago area and is often used as a specimen or dense shade tree. Its heart-shaped leaves and fragrant flowers in June make it especially attractive for people, while songbirds and blue jays are attracted to its seeds and use the tree for shelter.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Tilia americana 'McKSentry' (American Sentry® linden)

    American Sentry® linden, American Sentry® basswood
    The American Sentry linden is reported to have some resistance to Japanese beetle. It is a dense shade tree with heart-shaped leaves and fragrant flowers; this cultivar is particularly symmetrical. This is a cultivated variety of a native plant.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Tilia cordata (Little-leaved linden)

    little-leaved linden, littleleaf linden
    Little-leaved linden is a great shade tree for lawns or parkway plantings in urban settings due to its ability to withstand polluted environments. It has shiny dark green leaves that turn a clear yellow in fall, and in summer it has dangling, fragrant pale yellow flowers. This tree is prone to attack by Japanese beetles.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Tilia mongolica (Mongolian linden)

    Mongolian linden
    Mongolian linden is smaller than other species of lindens and it has an unusual exfoliating (peeling) bark. It is slower growing than other lindens. Fall color is a moderate yellow.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Tilia platyphyllos (Big-leaved linden)

    big-leaved linden, bigleaf linden
    Like other lindens, big-leaved linden produces clusters of very fragrant flowers in early summer. It has an attractive form and can be used as a street tree. This species may be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Tilia tomentosa (Silver linden)

    silver linden
    Silver linden has leaves that are dark green above and silvery-white below. It can be used as a street tree.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Tsuga canadensis (Eastern hemlock)

    eastern hemlock, Canada hemlock, Canadian hemlock
    One of the more shade-tolerant evergreens, the eastern hemlock has many uses as a specimen, sheared as a hedge, or planted for screening. Native to the eastern United States, the hemlock resembles a large Christmas tree with its broadly pyramidal, pendulous branches; fine, dark-green needles; and abundant brown cones that hang from branches like small ornaments.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • North America
  • Ulmus (Elm cultivars)

    Elm
    A number of elms are available that can resist the pathogen that causes the devastating Dutch elm disease. Since the disease first began mowing down American elms in the 1930s, scientists and breeders have been developing alternatives. Most of these trees are hybrids that cross various species of American, Asian and European elms. Some are selections of species that were observed to resist the disease. Not all these trees have the characteristic vase- or fountain-shaped arching branch structure of the beloved American elm, but some come close. Some also have resistance to other disease and pests that trouble elms. As time goes on, better cultivars are developed, but some of the older ones may still be on the market.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'Frontier' (Frontier elm)

    Frontier elm
    The Frontier elm has good resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED) and elm yellows and moderate resistance to elm leaf beetle. This hardy, tolerant tree is a good choice for residential landscapes and along city streets.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet),
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'Morton Glossy' (TRIUMPH™ elm)

    TRIUMPH™ elm
    The TRIUMPH™ elm has very good resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED) and is resistant to elm yellows; it also has good resistance to elm leaf beetle. It is easily transplanted, quick to establish, and adaptable to most soil types. Large, lustrous, dark green summer foliage gives way to yellow fall color. Useful for home and commercial landscapes or parks or as street tree.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'Morton Red Tip' (DANADA CHARM™ elm)

    DANADA CHARM™ elm
    The DANADA CHARM™ elm has very good Dutch elm disease (DED) and elm yellows resistance but is susceptible to elm leaf beetle. Its size makes it ideal for large yards and along streets. Its emerging leaves are glossy red, turning dark green in summer and yellow in fall. This tree is a Chicagoland Grows® selection.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'Morton Stalwart' (COMMENDATION™ elm)

    COMMENDATION™ elm
    This fast-growing cultivar is extremely tolerant of drought and cold. The COMMENDATION™ elm is resistant to Dutch elm disease (DED) but moderately susceptible to insect problems, notably elm leaf beetle, Japanese beetle, and gypsy moth. Use along streets and in large yards. The Morton Arboretum introduced this cultivar through Chicagoland Grows®.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'New Horizon' (New Horizon elm)

    New Horizon elm
    The New Horizon elm has slightly arching branches that give it a finer textured appearance than most elms. It has excellent resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED), elm leaf miner, and verticillium wilt. This cultivar has large dark green leaves that take on a rusty-red tint in fall. Useful as street, parkway, or shade tree.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet),
    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'Patriot' (Patriot elm)

    Patriot elm
    The Patriot elm has excellent resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED), excellent resistance to elm leaf beetles, and some resistance to elm yellows. This complex hybrid is fast-growing, vigorous, and easily established. It has glossy green foliage with yellow fall color. It is useful as street, parkway, or shade tree.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus 'Regal' (Regal elm)

    Regal elm
    The tall regal elm has good Dutch elm disease (DED) resistance. It can be used as a specimen or in groups for streets, parks, and large yards. This hybrid is a University of Wisconsin introduction.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus americana (American elm)

    American elm
    Elms are loved for their graceful, stately shape, with branches like spreading fountains, and their green leaves that turn gold in fall. Sadly, the American elm can no longer be recommended because it is vulnerable to a devastating pathogen called Dutch elm disease. For cultivars of American Elm that are resistant to Dutch elm disease, see below.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Ulmus americana 'Princeton' (Princeton elm)

    Princeton elm
    The Princeton elm exhibits good resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED) and demonstrates resistance to elm beetles as well. This large, fast-growing tree is tolerant of many adverse site conditions.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus davidiana var. japonica 'Morton' (ACCOLADE™ elm)

    ACCOLADE™ elm
    The ACCOLADE™ elm is a Chicagoland Grows® selection that demonstrates very good resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED), and elm leaf beetle. It is useful as a street, parkway, or shade tree. This elm has glossy green leaves and yellow fall color.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus davidiana var. japonica 'Prospector' (Prospector elm)

    Prospector elm, Prospector Wilson's elm
    The Prospector elm is a hybrid of Asian elm species; it is smaller than the American elm and exhibits excellent resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED) and elm leaf beetle. This fast-growing tree needs regular pruning to maintain its vase form. Its leaves emerge orange red and mature to green; in the fall, it erupts in a brilliant yellow. Useful as street, parkway, or shade tree.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus parvifolia (Lacebark elm)

    Lacebark elm, Chinese elm
    Chinese or lacebark elm stands out from other elms. It has an unusual mottled bark, leaves that are smaller than those of other elm species and good resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED) and elm leaf beetle.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus pumila (Siberian elm (Not receommended))

    Siberian elm, Chinese elm, littleleaf elm
    Siberian elms have invasive traits that enable them to spread aggressively. While these trees have demonstrated invasive traits, there is insufficient supporting research to declare them so pervasive that they cannot be recommended for any planting sites. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting these trees for planting sites.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ulmus rubra (Slippery elm (Not recommended))

    slippery elm
    Due to susceptibility to Dutch elm disease (DED), slippery elm is not recommended for planting anywhere in this region and usually require removal and/or replacement.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America

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