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  • Actinidia arguta (Hardy kiwi)

    Also known as:

    hardy kiwi, bower actinidia, tara vine
    Hardy kiwi is an ornamental twining vine that also produces edible fruit. The fruit are smaller that the kiwis sold in stores. Fruit production requires a male and a female plant.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Actinidia kolomikta (Hardy kiwi)

    Also known as:

    Hardy kiwi, Kolomikta kiwi, Kolomikta actinidia
    The hardy kiwi vine will twist and spiral up any support, but is best placed in a site where it can enjoy partial shade to avoid sun scorch.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Adiantum pedatum (Maidenhair fern)

    Also known as:

    Maidenhair Fern, Northern Maidenhair fern
    Maidenhair fern is a unique, airy fern with fan-shaped fronds growing around a horseshoe-shaped stem.

    Size Range:

    • Medium plant (12-24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Aegopodium podagraria (Bishop's weed)

    Also known as:

    Bishop's weed, goutweed, Bishop's goutweed, ashweed, ground elder, ground ash
    Bishop's weed was sold as a fast growing ground cover for many years (and is still available in some areas), but it is a plant of concern and should only be used after careful consideration of the planting site. It is an aggressive grower and often considered a weed. In some Eastern states it is considered a noxious weed and is banned or prohibited.

    Size Range:

    • Small plant (6-12 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Aesculus carnea (Red horse-chestnut )

    Also known as:

    red horse-chestnut, red horsechestnut
    The red horse-chestnut, a cross between horse-chestnut and red buckeye, is an excellent shade tree for large areas. Its distinctive, rose-red, cone-shaped flower clusters bloom in May among the lustrous dark green leaves.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Aesculus flava (Yellow buckeye)

    Also known as:

    yellow buckeye, sweet buckeye
    Buckeyes are known for their flower displays in May; yellow buckeyes are no exception. This Illinois native produces yellow flowers in upright clusters measuring up to 6 inches tall. In fall, the leaves display a yellow-orange color. It is susceptible to leaf blotch and may be difficult to find in nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Aesculus glabra (Ohio buckeye)

    Also known as:

    Ohio buckeye
    The Ohio buckeye is a neatly rounded tree with low, sweeping branches and dense foliage that provides deep shade. It is one of the first trees to leaf out in the spring. This tree is susceptible to leaf blotch.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Aesculus hippocastanum (Horse chestnut)

    Also known as:

    horse-chestnut, horse chestnut, common horse-chestnut
    Horse chestnut is a large tree known for showy flowers in May. The clusters of white flowers may be 6 inches tall or more. This non-native can be messy when its fruit drops and offers little in the way of fall color.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Aesculus parviflora (Bottlebrush buckeye)

    Also known as:

    Bottlebrush buckeye
    Bottlebrush buckeye is a handsome shrub that has memorable long fluffy white flower clusters in early July. It is useful as an understory planting in woodland gardens, as a specimen plant, or in a shrub border. Also known as Aesculus macrostachya.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Aesculus pavia (Red buckeye)

    Also known as:

    red buckeye
    Red buckeye is quite lovely in spring, with its tall clusters of red flowers. It is a small tree, able to be planted under power lines. This tree is susceptible to leaf blotch.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Agastache aurantiaca (Golden hyssop)

    Also known as:

    Golden hyssop, Giant hyssop
    Golden hyssop is a short-lived perennial with open airy habit producing golden orange flower spikes. Native to mountain ledges in Arizona to New Mexico this plant requires well-drained sunny locations. In northern climates site in a protected area. Hummingbirds, butterflies are attracted to the late summer flowers.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise-hyssop)

    Also known as:

    Anise-hyssop, Anise hyssop, Blue Giant hyssop, Fragrant giant hyssop, Anise mint
    Anise-hyssop is a short-lived perennial with profuse, long-lasting, tight spikes of lavender-blue flowers. Leaves and flowers smell like anise. Excellent ornamental for the summer garden.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches),
    • Medium plant (12-24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Agastache rupestris (Thread-leaved giant-hyssop)

    Also known as:

    Thread-leaved giant-hyssop, Thread-leaf giant hyssop, Licorice mint, Rock Anise hussop
    Thread-leaved giant-hyssop is a striking, hardy perennial with slender, branched, gray-green foliage and rosy-orange tubular flowers.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Ageratina altissima (syn. Eupatorium rugosum) (White snakeroot)

    Also known as:

    White snakeroot
    White snakeroot is an open, smooth-stemmed perennial wildflower reaching 2 to 4 feet high with slightly branched clusters of bright white flowers in late summer and fall. Commonly found in shaded woodlands and naturalized landscapes.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Ailanthus altissima (Tree of heaven (Not recommended))

    Also known as:

    tree of heaven, paradise tree
    Tree of heaven has invasive traits that enable it to spread aggressively. This tree is under observation and may be listed on official invasive species lists in the near future. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this tree for planting sites. Tree of heaven is an aggressive grower and produces a lot of suckers. It is generally not recommended for landscapes.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Ajuga reptans (Bugleweed)

    Also known as:

    Bugleweed, carpet bugleweed, ajuga
    The low, dense spreading habit of bugleweed makes an excellent ground cover for part-shade or shady areas.

    Size Range:

    • Small plant (6-12 inches),
    • Low-growing plant (under 6 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Akebia quinata (Five-leaved akebia)

    Also known as:

    Five-leaved akebia, chocolate vine
    Five-leaved akebia is a vigorous vine and may grow aggressively enough that it needs to be controlled. Akebia has invasive traits that enable it to spread aggressively. This plant is under observation and may be listed on official invasive species lists in the near future. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this vine for planting sites.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily),
    • Full shade (4 hrs or less of light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Alchemilla mollis (Lady's mantle)

    Also known as:

    Lady's mantle, bear's foot, lion's foot, nine hooks
    Lady's mantle is a clump forming perennial that is often used as a ground cover. Planting individual plant close together gives the appearance of a ground cover. In addition, this plant tends to self-seed and so helps to maintain the ground cover effect by filling in with small seedlings.

    Size Range:

    • Medium plant (12-24 inches),
    • Small plant (6-12 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Allium aflatunense (Ornamental onion)

    Also known as:

    Ornamental onion
    Ornamental onion is an easy-to-grow perennial for a sunny spring garden. Although a bulb, it is often purchased as a potted plant. Long, slender, flat leaves give way to large, multi-flowered clusters of purple flowers. Attracts butterflies and other pollinators.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches),
    • Medium plant (12-24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Allium cernuum (Nodding wild onion)

    Also known as:

    Wild onion, Nodding wild onion, Wild nodding onion, Lady's leeks, Nodding onion
    Nodding wild onion is native in open woods and slopes from Canada to Mexico, including northeast Illinois. Mounds of flat, grass-like leaves support stalks of nodding, bell-shaped, purplish-pink flower clusters in June through August. Great plant for front of the border, rock garden, and naturalized areas.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches),
    • Medium plant (12-24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois
  • Allium schoenoprasum (Chives)

    Also known as:

    Chive, Chives, Wild chives
    Chives is a perennial bulb often grown as an herb for its edible leaves. The dense clusters of light pink to purplish white flowers have a honey-scent and add ornamental interest to the summer garden.

    Size Range:

    • Medium plant (12-24 inches),
    • Small plant (6-12 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Allium senescens (German garlic)

    Also known as:

    German garlic, blue broad-leaved chives, curly chives, cowlick chives
    German garlic, also known as broad-leaved chives, is a beautiful perennial adding a long season of interest to the landscape. Dense round clusters of lavender-pink flowers appear above the deep green, glossy foliage mid-summer lasting long into the season. Tolerant of drought, deer, rabbits, and hot weather.

    Size Range:

    • Medium plant (12-24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Allium thunbergii (Thunberg's onion)

    Also known as:

    Thunberg's onion, Japanese onion, Thunberg's allium
    Thunberg's onion is a compact, clump-forming, perennial bulb that adds seasonal interest in the late fall garden. Clusters of lavender-pink flowers open above the grass-like foliage in late summer blooming into fall when the leaves turn a rusty orange color.

    Size Range:

    • Large plant (more than 24 inches),
    • Medium plant (12-24 inches)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Alnus glutinosa (European black alder (Not recommended))

    Also known as:

    European black alder, European alder, Common alder
    European black alder has invasive traits that enable it to spread aggressively. This tree is under observation and may be listed on official invasive species lists in the near future. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this tree for planting sites.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Alnus incana (European white alder)

    Also known as:

    European white alder, white alder, gray alder
    European white alder is a fast-growing tree that may be considered as a street tree. Early spring flowers are interesting, but not really showy. This tree may be difficult to find in local nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Large tree (more than 40 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Non-native
  • Alnus incana subsp. rugosa (Speckled alder)

    Also known as:

    speckled alder
    Speckled alder is a smaller tree that is appropriate for planting under power lines. Early spring flowers are interesting, but not really showy. This tree may be difficult to find in local nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America
  • Alnus maritima (Seaside alder)

    Also known as:

    seaside alder, brook alder
    Seaside alder is a fast-growing native tree. It stays short enough to be used under utility lines, but may be difficult to locate in local nurseries.

    Size Range:

    • Medium tree (25-40 feet),
    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Amelanchier canadensis (Canada serviceberry)

    Also known as:

    Canada serviceberry, Canada shadbush, thicket serviceberry, Juneberry, shadblow serviceberry, shadblow, shadbush, shadbush serviceberry, sugarplum, Thicket Serviceberry)
    This large deciduous shrub or small tree, with many colony-forming erect stems, is often found growing in swampy, wet sites in eastern North America. In yards and landscapes in the Midwest, Canada serviceberry is best suited for wet sites. It has white blooms in early spring followed by oval green leaves and edible red fruit, attractive to birds, in mid to late summer. The fall color is orange-red.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet),
    • Compact tree (10-15 feet),
    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Amelanchier alnifolia (Saskatoon serviceberry)

    Also known as:

    Saskatoon serviceberry, western serviceberry, alder-leaved serviceberry, Indian Pear
    Saskatoon or western serviceberry is a medium to large upright, multi-stemmed shrub with four-season interest. The clusters of fragrant, white drooping flowers appear in spring, followed by large, bluish-purple berries which are juicy and edible. Small blue-green leaves turn brilliant yellow and red in fall and the light gray bark is smooth with vertical streaks add winter interest. Excellent for shrub borders, woodland gardens and in mass.

    Size Range:

    • Large shrub (more than 8 feet),
    • Medium shrub (5-8 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • North America
  • Amelanchier arborea (Downy serviceberry)

    Also known as:

    downy serviceberry, juneberry, serviceberry
    Downy serviceberry is a four-season plant offering white flowers in spring, small red berries in summer, excellent fall color and gray bark in winter. The fruit is usually eaten very quickly by birds.

    Size Range:

    • Small tree (15-25 feet)

    Light Exposure:

    • Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily),
    • Partial sun/shade (4-6 hrs light daily)

    Native Locale:

    • Chicago area,
    • Illinois,
    • North America

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