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Arbor Day Plant Sale 2016 frequently asked questions.

At any season of the year, the Plant Clinic of The Morton Arboretum is ready to help homeowners and professionals have lovely and useful gardens and healthy trees and plants.

Winter is a fine time to prune shrubs. When the leaves are gone, you can see the true form of the plant to help you choose which branch to cut, says Kunso Kim, head of collections and curator at The Morton Arboretum. How you prune will depend on each shrub’s situation.
Animals that need food to survive the winter can take a toll on perennials, shrubs, and young trees. Simple steps can minimize the damage, according to Peter Linsner, who is in charge of animal control at The Morton Arboretum.
What is a pine or spruce cone? Think of it as an egg carton. Each of the layered scales once created a sealed compartment for one or two seeds. You can find many sizes and shapes of cones among the more than 100 kinds of trees in the Conifer Collection at The Morton Arboretum. Their ancestry is ancient: Conifer fossils go back 300 million years.
Many have asked how the Arboretum created Illumination, our first lights event. To bring our vision to life, the Arboretum partnered with top lighting design firm Lightswitch, a company that’s created lighting experiences for institutions around the world, including Virgin Galactic and the 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge.
The same pots that burst with bright annuals this summer can provide color, texture, and interest this winter, according to Abigail Rea, manager of horticulture at The Morton Arboretum. Many of the materials can be found right in your garden. Rea offers tips for interesting holiday containers.
Don’t forget to keep watering as the season draws to a close. It’s especially important to water evergreens and any trees, shrubs, or perennials planted within the last two years, says Sharon Yiesla, Plant Clinic assistant at The Morton Arboretum.
Hikes at The Morton Arboretum. Get out and explore the Arboretum's 16 miles of paved or wood-chipped trails.
When Ray Schulenberg and other Morton Arboretum staff members set out to recreate a prairie on an eight-acre patch of farmland 51 years ago, there were no instructions to follow.

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