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If you make sure your Christmas tree is recycled into mulch or compost to improve soil and protect plants, you’ll know it didn’t go to waste.
Keeping notes (or taking pictures) is a big help in planning to improve your garden. The soil may now be frozen and the weather may be frightful, but it’s not too late to jot down your memories of what worked and what didn't in the past gardening year.
Your own backyard can provide a bounty of beauty for autumn decorating, including a centerpiece for the Thanksgiving table.
October is a spectacular month to check out The Morton Arboretum and our abundant fall color. Enhance your trip to the Arboretum by tuning into these beautiful classical music selections while traveling our 16 miles of trails or winding around our 9 miles of paved roads.
Each accessioned plant has a small metal tag attached on its south side. These labels include the plant's name, location, and accession number.
There’s no better place to be on a hot August day than the shade of a tree. It’s cool and green, full of music from the rustling of leaves and the song of birds. No stress can last long under a tree. It’s true. Researchers have documented many ways that trees lift our spirits and help our health. So let’s enjoy the shade of the trees we have and protect them for summers to come.
A cold, shivery winter like this one often makes gardeners worry about their plants. But in fact, plants probably suffer less than people, says Doris Taylor, Plant Clinic manager at The Morton Arboretum.
Suggestions for shrubs from the Spring 2014 issue of Seasons, the member magazine of The Morton Arboretum.
Long ago, in an old forest in Northern Michigan, a tree fell down. Suddenly the forest floor was flooded with sunlight, and dozens of tiny white pine seedlings sprinted toward the sky. From the Spring 2014 issue of Seasons, the member magazine of The Morton Arboretum.
In earliest spring, before flowers and leaves brighten the forest, there’s already a bustling world beneath the brown leaves. From the Spring 2014 issue of Seasons, the member magazine of The Morton Arboretum.

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